The Case that Never Dies: The Lindbergh Kidnapping (Google eBook)

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Rutgers University Press, 2004 - True Crime - 480 pages
6 Reviews

The Case That Never Dies places the Lindbergh kidnapping, investigation, and trial in the context of the Depression, when many feared the country was on the edge of anarchy. Gardner delves deeply into the aspects of the case that remain confusing to this day, including Lindbergh's dealings with crime baron Owney Madden, Al Capone's New York counterpart, as well as the inexplicable exploits of John Condon, a retired schoolteacher who became the prosecution's best witness. The initial investigation was hampered by Colonel Lindbergh, who insisted that the police not attempt to find the perpetrator because he feared the investigation would endanger his son's life. He relented only when the child was found dead.

After two years of fruitless searching, Bruno Richard Hauptmann, a German immigrant, was discovered to have some of the ransom money in his possession. Hauptmann was arrested, tried, and sentenced to death. Throughout  the book, Gardner pays special attention to the evidence of the case and how it was used and misused in the trial. Whether Hauptmann was guilty or not, Gardner concludes that there was insufficient evidence to convict him of first-degree murder.

Set in historical context, the book offers not only a compelling read, but a powerful vantage point from which to observe the United States in the 1930s as well as contemporary arguments over capital punishment.

  

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Review: The Case That Never Dies: The Lindbergh Kidnapping

User Review  - Erin - Goodreads

Weirdly dry and boring for such a fascinating crime. Think a different type of writer might have been able to construct a more flowing narrative. Read full review

Review: The Case That Never Dies: The Lindbergh Kidnapping

User Review  - Jill Crosby - Goodreads

I had been led to believe that this book, being a more recent publication, was going to provide new insight into the details of the Lindbergh kidnapping. What I got instead was a cool 400 pages of ... Read full review

Contents

SUDDEN FAME
5
BETTY COWS JOURNEY
11
MICKEY ROSNERS GAME
34
MAN OF MYSTERY
57
INTERROGATIONS
88
EXPERT OPINIONS MONEY HANDWRITING AND A LADDER
112
CONFRONTATIONS
143
IN DISTRICT ATTORNEY FOLEYS OFFICE
173
THE SEARCH FOR ISIDOR FISCH
243
JUDGE TRENCHARDS COURTROOM
267
TRIAL BY EXPERTS
298
CROSS EXAMINATIONS
321
THE GOVERNOR AND THE MAN IN THE DEATH HOUSE
358
THE PALATE OF MORTALS
397
Notes
417
Bibliography
463

MRWILENTZ BUILDS HIS CASE
199
VISIONS OF A LADDER
222

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Page 3 - I started to climb out of the cockpit, but as soon as one foot appeared through the door I was dragged the rest of the way without assistance on my part. For nearly half an hour I was unable to touch the ground, during which time I was ardently carried around in what seemed to be a very small area, and in every position it is possible to be in.
Page 4 - And now, my fellow-citizens, this young man has returned. He is here. He has brought his unsullied fame home. It is our great privilege to welcome back to his native land, on behalf of his own people, who have a deep affection for him and have been thrilled by his splendid achievement, a Colonel of the United States Officers...
Page 4 - Our messenger of peace and good-will had broken down another barrier of time and space and brought two great peoples into closer communion. In less than a day and a half he had crossed the ocean over which Columbus had traveled for sixty-nine days and the Pilgrim Fathers for sixty-six days on their way to the New World. "But, above all, in showering applause and honors upon this genial, modest American youth, with the naturalness, the simplicity and the poise of true greatness, France had the opportunity...

About the author (2004)

Lloyd C. Gardner, a professor of history at Rutgers University, is the author of over a dozen books on U.S. foreign relations. Among the awards he has received are two Fulbright Professorships and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

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