The Tlingit Indians

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University of Washington Press, 1991 - History - 488 pages
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Lieutenant George Thornton Emmons, United States Navy, was stationed in Alaska during the 1880s and 1890s, a time when the Navy was largely responsible for law and stability in the territory. His duties brought him into close contact with the Tlingit Indians, whose respect he won and from whom he gained an understanding of and respect for their culture. He became a friend of many Tlingit leaders, visited their homes, travelled in their canoes when on leave, purchased native artifacts and recorded native traditions. In addition to an interest in native manufacturing and in the more spectacular aspects of native life - such as bear hunting, Chilkat blankets, feuds and the potlatch - Emmons showed the ethnographer's devotion to recording all aspects of the culture together with the Tlingit terms, and came to understand Tlingit beliefs and values better than did any of his non-native contemporaries. He was widely recognized for his extensive collections of Tlingit artifacts and art, and for the detailed notes that accompanied them.
  

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Contents

THE LAND AND THE PEOPLE
3
SOCIAL ORGANIZATION
21
VILLAGES HOUSES FORTS AND OTHER WORKS
58
TRAVEL AND TRANSPORTATION
84
CHAPTERS FISHING AND HUNTING
102
MENS WORK
165
WOMENS WORK
210
DRESS AND DECORATION
234
CEREMONIES
292
WAR AND PEACE
324
ILLNESS AND MEDICINE
359
WITCHCRAFT
398
GAMES AND GAMBLING
413
TIME TIDES AND WINDS
423
Tables I
429
Copyright

THE LIFE CYCLE
256

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About the author (1991)

NATANT