The Family: Power, Politics and Fundamentalism's Shadow Elite

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Univ. of Queensland Press, 2008 - Fundamentalism - 454 pages
22 Reviews
A journalist's penetrating and controversial look at the untold story of Christian fundamentalism's most elite organisation: a self-described 'invisible' global network dedicated to a religion of power for the powerful.
They are 'the Family' - fundamentalism's avant-garde, waging spiritual war in the halls of American power and around the globe. They consider themselves the 'new chosen': congressmen, generals and foreign dictators who meet in confidential 'cells', to pray and plan for a 'leadership led by God', to be won not by force but through 'quiet diplomacy'. Jeff Sharlet is the only journalist to have reported from inside its walls.
The Family is about the other half of American fundamentalist power - not its angry masses, but its sophisticated elites. In public, they host Prayer Breakfasts; in private they preach a gospel of 'biblical capitalism', military might and American empire. Citing Hitler, Lenin and Mao as leadership models, the Family's current leader, Doug Coe, declares, 'We work with power where we can, build new power where we can't'.
Part history, part investigative journalism, The Family is a compelling account of how fundamentalism came to be interwoven with American power and the no-holds-barred economics of globalisation. No other book about the Right has exposed the Family or revealed its far-reaching impact on democracy, and no future reckoning of fundamentalism will be able to ignore it.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MarkBeronte - LibraryThing

They insist they are just a group of friends, yet they funnel millions of dollars through tax-free corporations. They claim to disdain politics, but congressmen of both parties describe them as the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jcambridge - LibraryThing

A revealing and frightening book that I read for one of my local bookclubs...The "headquarters" of this movement is within walking distance of my home, making it all the more troubling. Despite having ... Read full review

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