The Hand-book of the Pennsylvania Lines (Google eBook)

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Poole bros., 1888 - United States - 81 pages
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Page 61 - For children under five years of age when accompanied by an adult no charge shall be made. 5. For the use of any vehicle mentioned in this section conveying one or more passengers when hired by the hour with the privilege of going from place to place and stopping as often as may be required, as follows : For the first hour one dollar ; for each additional hour or part, thereof at the rate of one dollar an hour.
Page 61 - line balls" (ie large social gatherings where cabs and carriages pass in line), one or two passengers, to any point south of Fifty-Ninth Street, two dollars; each additional passenger, fifty cents; north of Fifty-Ninth Street, each additional mile shall be charged for at a rate not to exceed fifty cents per mile. 7. Every owner or driver of any hackney coach or cab shall carry on his coach or cab one piece of baggage, not to exceed fifty pounds in weight, without extra charge; but for any additional...
Page 61 - In a single trip, there will be no charge. 4. For the use of a coach, by the hour, with the privilege of going from place to place and stopping as often and long as may be required, one dollar and fifty cents for the first hour or part thereof, and for each succeeding half-hour or part thereof, seventy-five cents. 5. No cab or coach shall be driven by the time rate at a pace less than five miles an hour. 6. From "line balls...
Page 64 - ... visiting, sight-seeing, or other business, it may be more advantageous to engage a room at an hotel on the European plan, and thus save time and money by being able to take his meals wherever he may happen to be. The prices of rooms have a wide range, depending entirely upon size and location. From $1 to $3 per day is a fair estimate; the former price will procure a single room for one gentleman, and the latter a fair-sized chamber for two persons, at a good house. For suites comprising sitting-room,...
Page 61 - Fifty cents for the first mile or part thereof; and each additional half mile or part thereof, twentyfive cents. By distance, for "stops" of over five minutes and not exceeding fifteen minutes, twenty-five cents.
Page 64 - ... price. At hotels on the American plan, breakfast, lunch, dinner, both at mid-day and at night, tea at night for those who dine at mid-day, and supper until midnight, are the meals set by the most expensive. At all of them at least three meals a day are served. The prices range from $2.50 a day to $4 a day ; but these merely represent a basis upon which higher prices are computed for rooms of extra size, number, and location. Among the first-class hotels on this plan are the Fifth Avenue, Windsor,...
Page 64 - Delmonico's, as at all other strictly first-class restaurants, the rule that what is enough for one is enough for two obtains. If the waiter on taking an order for two persons inquires whether you wish one portion or two, it is certain that one is enough. If the point is not raised by the waiter the inquiry should be made by the diner.
Page 64 - ... prices, which are commensurate with the service. Two persons can dine at Delmonico's modestly for $5, but unless one is prepared to spend at least that amount he should seek some less expensive place. This sum includes a bottle of good claret, although the. cheapest on the list. It may be said here, however, that at Delmonico's, as at all other strictly first-class restaurants, the rule that what is enough for one is enough tor two obtains.
Page 64 - ... and private dinner parties and balls are also arranged for persons who desire it, absolutely without care or trouble to themselves other than drawing a cheque for the expenses, which are never small. On the upper floors are a limited number of apartments for gentlemen. The cuisine and the service at this house are not surpassed by any restaurant in the world, and the same may safely be said of the prices, which are commensurate with the service. Two persons can dine at Delmonico's modestly for...
Page 64 - Manhattan and Metropolitan are nearer the business centers ; they have both been recently refurnished. Among the most elegant hotels in New York which are conducted on the European plan are the Brunswick, the Buckingham, the Brevoort, the Grand, the Gilsey, the Hoffman, and the St. James. The Astor, far down town, maintains its old reputation. Among tie less expensive but excellent hotels on this plan are the Leland, Continental, Glenham,St.

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