Stalinist Terror: New Perspectives

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John Arch Getty, Roberta Thompson Manning
Cambridge University Press, Jun 25, 1993 - History - 294 pages
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This collection of essays by scholars from five nations - the United States, Great Britain, Australia, France, and Russia - makes several major contributions to the understanding of Stalinist terror in the 1930s. The essays explore in greater depth than before the background of the terror and patterns of persecution, while providing more empirically founded and substantiated estimates of the numbers of Stalin's victims. Some contributors tap unexplored or underutilized source materials while others have taken advantage of glasnost and the opening of Soviet archives and libraries for the years of the terror to draw on freshly available archival and secondary materials. Many of the essays are informed by distinct trends in social and political history, and they approach Stalinist terror with fresh methods and perspectives. The volume supplements works that have focused exclusively on Stalin's personality by concentrating instead on preconditions, mentalities, economics, and specific groups. Although Stalin remains the central personality in the terror, other leaders, institutions, and social groups played important roles, and by analyzing them the essays in the volume help to provide a more complete and balanced view of the phenomenon of the terror as a whole.
  

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Contents

Narkom Ezhov
21
The Politics of Repression Revisited
40
The Second Coming Class Enemies in the Soviet Countryside 19271935
65
The Omnipresent Conspiracy On Soviet Imagery of Politics and Social Relations in the 1930s
99
The Soviet Economic Crisis of 19361940 and the Great Purges
116
The Stakhanovite Movement The Background to the Great Terror in the Factories 19351938
142
The Great Terror on the Local Level Purges in Moscow Factories 19361938
163
The Great Purges in a Rural District Belyi Raion Revisited
168
The Red Army and the Great Purges
198
Stalinist Terror in the Donbas A Note
215
Patterns of repression among the Soviet elite in the late 1930s A biographical approach
225
The Impact of the Great Purges on Soviet Elites A Case Study from Moscow and Leningrad Telephone Directories of the 1930s
247
Victims of Stalinism How Many?
261
More Light on the Scale of Repression and Excess Mortality in the Soviet Union in the 1930s
275
Index
291
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Page vii - Research for this article was supported in part by a grant from the International Research and Exchanges Board (IREX), with funds provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the United States Information Agency, and the US Department of State.
Page 7 - Guide to the Records of the Smolensk Oblast of the All-Union Communist Party of the Soviet Union, 1917-1941, Washington 1980 (Bundesarchiv FA 774).

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About the author (1993)

J. Arch Getty is professor of history, UCLA. He is a foremost expert of the Stalin period and the history of the Soviet Communist Party. He lives in Los Angeles. Oleg V. Naumov is deputy director of the Moscow archive of the former Soviet Communist Party, RGASPI. Getty and Naumov are coauthors of "The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939," published by Yale University Press.

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