The Scented Ape: The Biology and Culture of Human Odour

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 29, 1990 - Medical - 286 pages
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Both men and women devote time and effort to removing natural body odour and replacing it with sexual attractant odours derived from plants and animals - we seem to need to smell of something other than people! Yet of all the apes, we are the most richly endowed with scent producing glands. This book examines the sense of smell in humans, comparing it with the known functions of the same sense in other animals. Odorous cues play a role in sexual physiology and behaviour in animals and there are claims that odour can play the same role in humans. The place of odours and scents in aesthetics and in psychoanalysis serves to illustrate the link between the emotional centres and the brain. The book presents arguments to explain the way in which our ancestral past has given rise to our modern day olfactory enigmas. The material is presented with as much explanation of the technical detail as possible to make the book accessible to a wide readership.
  

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Contents

III
1
V
12
VII
17
IX
31
X
45
XI
49
XIII
52
XIV
58
XXXII
135
XXXIII
142
XXXV
152
XXXVI
161
XXXVII
168
XXXVIII
169
XXXIX
182
XL
204

XV
62
XVI
70
XVII
71
XX
72
XXI
76
XXII
79
XXIV
93
XXV
97
XXVI
102
XXVII
111
XXVIII
116
XXIX
120
XXXI
121
XLI
207
XLIII
209
XLIV
216
XLV
222
XLVI
227
XLVII
230
XLVIII
231
XLIX
233
L
235
LII
246
LIII
251
LIV
279
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