Love in Art (Google eBook)

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L. C. Page, 1898 - Love in art - 246 pages
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Page 65 - ... aspect, did Titian conceive this picture. Nature as he presents it here is young and lovely, not transfigured into ineffable noblesse, but conscious and triumphant without loss of modesty. What the painter achieves, and no other master of the age achieves with equal success, is the representation of a beauteous living being whose fair and polished skin is depicted with enamelled gloss, and yet with every shade of modulation which a delicate flesh comports ; flesh not marbled or cold, but...
Page 179 - Belong to the woman who didn't know why (And now we know she never knew why) And did not understand. The fool was stripped to his foolish hide (Even as you and I !) Which she might have seen when she threw him aside, (But it isn't on record the lady tried) So some of him lived but the most of him died (Even as you and I!) And it isn't the shame and it isn't the blame That stings like a white-hot brand.
Page 64 - Venus" of Darmstadt, that of Florence is more fully developed, less of a girl, more of a woman, yet still lithe and slender. Lying as nature shaped her, with her legs entwined, at the foot of a deep green hanging, on a muslin sheet, that covers a ruby tinged damask couch, her left arm reposes on her frame, her right supporting her on cushions, whilst the hand is playing with a chaplet of flowers. We may fancy her to have bathed and to be waiting for the handmaids, who are busy in the room, one of...
Page 66 - Dialogo, ua, pp. 31-32. we look into the canvas that we might walk into that apartment and find room to wander in the grey twilight into which it is thrown by the summer sky that shows through the coupled windows.* It might occur to many to think that the " Venus " of the Uffizi was a portrait immortalizing the charms of a young and beautiful woman dear in a passing way to the Duke of Urbino.
Page 65 - ... shaped her, with her legs entwined, at the foot of a deep green hanging, on a muslin sheet, that covers a ruby tinged damask couch, her left arm reposes on her frame, her right supporting her on cushions, whilst the hand is playing with a chaplet of flowers. We may fancy her to have bathed and to be waiting for the handmaids, who are busy in the room, one of them having raised the lid* of a chest and taken a dress out, whilst a second stoops to select another. Meanwhile a little dog lies curled...
Page 99 - Prato ; it bears the three stories of the Presentation in the Temple, the Adoration of the Magi, and the Slaughter of the Innocents.
Page xiv - New York World. Love in Art By MARY KNIGHT POTTER Cloth decorative, I2mo, illustrated, $2.50. \ treatise on the love between man and woman as ^*- represented in the plastic arts from the middle of the seventeenth century. Primarily intended for those who have neither time nor desire to do much original research, it presents an interesting subject in an uncomplicated and direct manner. "The volume is taken up with the feeling that her words are authoritative, and that the book will be found of...
Page 89 - ... heard imaginary footsteps ascending the stairs, the door opening, and my curtains drawn, I at the same time as plainly heard any actual sound in or outside the house, and could not remark the slightest difference between them; and while I saw an imaginary assassin standing by my bed bending over me with a lamp in one hand and a dagger in the other, I could see any real tangible object which the degree of light that might be then in the room made visible. Though these visionary fears and imaginary...
Page 227 - T.ove is like the levin flash, Comes as swift, as swiftly goes, And his mark as surely knows. Thought is lumpish, thought is slow. Weighing long 'tween yes and no; When dear love is dead and gone Thought comes creeping in anon, And in his deserted nest, Sits to hold the crowner's quest.
Page 78 - FANCIES. 79 acters are presented to us as distinctly as in a modern psychological novel, and in our minds no more doubt is left than in Cupid's as to which of the two will be master in the new household.

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