The Neurological Basis of Learning, Development and Discovery: Implications for Science and Mathematics Instruction

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 30, 2003 - Education - 283 pages
0 Reviews
A goal of mine ever since becoming an educational researcher has been to help construct a sound theory to guide instructional practice. For far too long, educational practice has suffered because we have lacked firm instructional guidelines, which in my view should be based on sound psychological theory, which in turn should be based on sound neurological theory. In other words, teachers need to know how to teach and that "how-to-teach" should be based solidly on how people learn and how their brains function. As you will see in this book, my answer to the question of how people learn is that we all learn by spontaneously generating and testing ideas. Idea generating involves analogies and testing requires comparing predicted consequences with actual consequences. We learn this way because the brain is essentially an idea generating and testing machine. But there is more to it than this. The very process ofgenerating and testing ideas results not only in the construction of ideas that work (i. e. , the learning of useful declarative knowledge), but also in improved skill in learning (i. e. , the development of improved procedural knowledge).
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

HOW DO PEOPLE LEARN?
1
THE NEUROLOGICAL BASIS OF SELFREGULATION
27
BRAIN MATURATION INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT AND DESCRIPTIVE CONCEPT CONSTRUCTION
57
BRAIN MATURATION INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT AND THEORETICAL CONCEPT CONSTRUCTION
79
CREATIVE THINKING ANALOGY AND A NEURAL MODEL OF ANALOGICAL REASONING
99
THE ROLE OF ANALOGIES AND REASONING SKILL IN THEORETICAL CONCEPT CONSTRUCTION AND CHANGE
119
INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT DURING THE COLLEGE YEARS IS THERE A FIFTH STAGE?
135
WHAT KINDS OF SCIENTIFIC CONCEPTS EXIST?
159
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND NEUROLOGICAL MODELS OF SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERY
183
REJECTING NATURE OF SCIENCE MISCONCEPTIONS BY PRESERVICE TEACHERS
211
IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF KNOWLEDGE AND INSTRUCTION
225
REFERENCES
261
INDEX
277
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Dr. Anton Lawson s career in science education began in the late 1960s in California where he taught middle school science and mathematics for three years before completing his Ph.D. at the University of Oklahoma and moving to Purdue University in 1973. Lawson continued his research career at the University of California Berkeley in 1974, and then moved to Arizona State University in 1977, where he currently conducts research and teaches courses in biology, in biology teaching methods, and in research methods. Lawson has directed over 100 workshops for teachers, mostly on inquiry teaching methods, and has published over 200 articles and over 20 books including "Science Teaching and the Development of Thinking" (Wadsworth: Belmont, CA, 1995), "Biology: A Critical Thinking Approach, "(Addison Wesley: Menlo Park, CA, 1994), and "The Neurological Basis of Learning, Development and Discovery, " (Kluwer: Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 2003). Lawson s most recent book is an introductory biology text called "Biology: An Inquiry Approach, " (Kendall/Hunt; Dubuque, IA, 2004). Lawson is perhaps best known for his research articles in science education, which have three times been judged to be the most significant articles of the year by the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST). He has also received NARST s career award for Distinguished Contributions to Science Education Research as well as the Outstanding Science Educator of the Year Award by the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science.