Ohio History, Volume 25 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The Society, 1916 - Ohio
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Page 72 - Let thy work appear unto thy servants, And thy glory unto their children. And let the beauty of the LORD our God be upon us: And establish thou the work of our hands upon us; Yea, the work of our hands establish thou it.
Page 451 - Whole in himself, a common good. Mourn for the man of amplest influence, Yet clearest of ambitious crime, Our greatest yet with least pretence, Great in council and great in war, Foremost captain of his time, Rich in saving common-sense, And, as the greatest only are, In his simplicity sublime.
Page 451 - One who never turned his back but marched breast forward, Never doubted clouds would break, Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph, Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better, i Sleep to wake.
Page 190 - I thank God there are no free schools nor printing, and I hope we shall not have, these hundred years, for learning has brought disobedience and heresies and sects into the world, and printing has divulged them and libels against the best government. God keep us from both...
Page 148 - Try all things, hold fast by that which is good;" it is the foundation of the Reformation, which simply illustrated the axiom that every man should be able to give a reason for the faith that is in him; it is the great principle of Descartes; it is the fundamental axiom of modern science.
Page 467 - And supple-tempered will That bent like perfect steel to spring again and thrust. His was no lonely mountain-peak of mind, Thrusting to thin air o'er our cloudy bars, A sea-mark now, now lost in vapors blind; Broad prairie rather, genial, levellined, Fruitful and friendly for all human kind, Yet also nigh to heaven and loved of loftiest stars.
Page 448 - Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, What anvils rang, what hammers beat, In what a forge, and what a heat Were shaped the anchors of thy hope!
Page 427 - Weep not for her ! Weep not for her ! Her memory is the shrine Of pleasant thoughts, soft as the scent of flowers, Calm as on windless eve the sun's decline, Sweet as the song of birds among the bowers, Rich as a rainbow with its hues of light, Pure as the moonshine of an autumn night : Weep not for her...
Page 413 - Every year they're marching slower, Every year they're stooping lower. Every year the lilting music stirs the hearts of older men; Every year the flags above them Seem to bend and bless and love them As if grieving for the future when they'll never march again!
Page 62 - That therefore, which makes a good constitution, must keep it, viz: men of wisdom and virtue, qualities that because they descend not with worldly inheritances, must be carefully propagated by a virtuous education of youth, for which after ages will owe more to the care and prudence of founders, and the successive magistracy, than to their parents for their private patrimonies.

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