The Descent of Man: And Selection in Relation to Sex, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1871 - Evolution - 491 pages
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Review: The Descent of Man

User Review  - Adel Adel Abbas - Goodreads

a thought provocating book. it discusses what is knowbn as sexual selection and the role played by the female to enhance the selection of specific characters in male. Darwin claims that through his ... Read full review

Review: The Descent of Man

User Review  - Matthew Paluch - Goodreads

Absolutely brilliant, absolutely difficult to read. Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
38
III
99
IV
154
V
183
VI
239
VII
274
VIII
316
IX
355
X
385

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Page 381 - But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her, for her hair is given her for a covering.
Page 389 - We thus learn that man is descended from a hairy quadruped, furnished with a tail and pointed ears, probably arboreal in its habits, and an inhabitant of the Old World.
Page 386 - ... on the same plan with that of other mammals the occasional reappearance of various structures, for instance of several distinct muscles, which man does not normally possess, but which are common to the Quadrumana and a crowd of analogous facts all point in the plainest manner to the conclusion that man is the co-descendant with other mammals of a common progenitor.
Page 402 - He is impelled by nearly the same motives as the lower animals when left to their own free choice, though he is in so far superior to them that he highly values mental charms and virtues. On the other hand he is strongly attracted by mere wealth or rank. Yet he might by selection do something not only for the bodily constitution and...
Page 362 - We may indeed conclude from what we know of the jealousy of all male quadrupeds, armed, as many of them are, with special weapons for battling with their rivals, that promiscuous intercourse in a state of nature is extremely improbable.
Page 386 - The great principle of evolution stands up clear and firm, when these groups of facts are considered in connection with others, such as the mutual affinities of the members of the same group, their geographical distribution in past and present times, and their geological succession. It is incredible that all these facts should speak falsely.
Page 327 - The chief distinction in the intellectual powers of the two sexes is shown by man's attaining to a higher eminence, in whatever he takes up, than can woman - whether requiring deep thought, reason, or imagination, or merely the use of the senses and hands.
Page 395 - The idea of a universal and beneficent Creator of the universe does not seem to arise in the mind of man, until he has been elevated by long-continued culture.
Page 403 - Man, like every other animal, has no doubt advanced to his present high condition through a struggle for existence, consequent on his rapid multiplication, and if he is to advance still higher it is to be feared that he must remain subject to a severe struggle ; otherwise he would sink into indolence, and the more gifted men would not be more successful in the battle of life than the less gifted.
Page 398 - The sexual struggle is of two kinds; in the one it is between individuals of the same sex, generally the males, in order to drive away or kill their rivals, the females remaining passive; whilst in the other, the struggle is likewise between the individuals of the same sex, in order to excite or charm those of the opposite sex, generally the females, which no longer remain passive, but select the more agreeable partners.

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