Statistical Physics, Part 2

Front Cover
Butterworth-Heinemann, Jan 1, 1980 - Science - 387 pages
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The second part of 'Statistical Physics' deals with the quantum theory of the condensed state of matter. This volume is essentially an entirely new book, based on the large amount of new material which has become available in statistical physics since' Part 1' was published.


  

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Contents

THE NORMAL FERMI LIQUID 1 Elementary exitattons in a quantum Fermi liquid
1
Interaction of quasipar tides
8
Magnetic susceptibility of a Fermi liquid
12
Zero sound
13
Spin waves in a Fermi liquid
19
A degenerate almost ideal Feimi gas with repulsion between the particles
21
Greens functions in a macroscopic system
28
Determination of the enregy spectrum from the Greens function
33
The structure of the mixed state
193
I iamagnetic susceptibility above the transition point
201
The Josephson effect
204
Relation between current and magnetic field in a superconductor
208
Depth of penetration of a magnetic field into a superconductor
214
Superconducting alloys
216
The Cooper effect for nonzero orbital angular momenta of the pair
219
ELECTRONS IN THE CRYSTAL LATTICE 55 An electron in a periocid field
223

Greens function of an ideal Fermi gas
38
Particle momentum distribution in a Fermi liquid
41
Calculation of thermodynamic quantities from the Greens function
42
P operators in the interaction representation
43
The diagram technique for Fermi systems
46
The selfenergy function
53
The twoparticle Greens function
56
The relation of the vertex function of the quasiparticle scattering amplitude
60
The vertex function for small momentum transfers
63
The relation of t he vertex function to the quasipai tide interaction function
68
Identities for derivatives of the Greens function
71
Derivation of the relation between the limiting momentum and the density
76
Greens function of an almost ideal Fermi gas
78
SUPERFLUIDITY 22 Elementary excitations in a quantum Bose liquid
85
Superfluidity U 24 Phonons in a liquid
95
A degenerate almost ideal Bose gas
98
The wave function of the condensate
102
Temperature dependence of the condensate density
106
Behaviour of the superfluid density near the Apoim
109
Quantized vortex filaments
111
A vortex filament in an almost ideal Bose gas
117
Greens functions in a Bose liquid
118
The diagram technique for a Bose liquid
125
Sellenergy functions
127
Disintegration of quasipanicles
131
Properties of the spectrum near its termination point
135
GREENS FUNCTIONS AT NONZERO TEMPERATURES 36 Greens functions at nonzero temperatures
141
Temperature Greens functions
146
The diagram technique for temperature Greens functions
149
SUPERCONDUCTIVITY 39 A superfluid Fermi gas The energy spectrum
153
A superfluid Fermi gas Thermodynamic properties
163
Greens functions in a supcrfluid Fermi gas
164
Temperature Greens functions in a superfluid Fermi gas
169
Superconductivity in metals
171
The superconductivity current
173
The GinzburgLandau equations
178
Surface tension at the boundary of superconducting and normal phases
184
The two types of superconductor
190
Effect of an external fied on electron motion in a lattice
232
Quasiclassical traiectories
236
Quasiclassical energy levels
240
The electron effective mass tensor in the lattice
243
Symmetry of electron states in a lattice in a magnetic field
247
Electronic spectra of normal metals
251
Greens function of electrons in a metal
255
The de Haasvan Alphen effect
259
Electronphonon interaction
266
Effect of the electronphonon interaction on the electron spectrum in a metal
270
The electron spectrum of solid insulators
274
Electrons and holes in semiconductors
277
The electron spectrum near the degeneracy point
279
MAGNETISM 69 Equation of motion of the magnetic moment in a ferromagnet
284
Magnons in a ferromagnet The spectrum 20
289
Magnons in a ferromagnet Thermodynamic quantities
295
The spin Hamihonian
300
Interaction of magnons
305
Magnons in an antiferromagnet
310
ELECTROMAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS 8 75 Greens function of a photon in a medium
314
Electromagnetic field fluctuations
319
Electromagnetic iluctuations in an infinite medium
321
Current fluctuations in linear circuits
326
Temperature Greens function of a photon in a medium
327
The van der Waals stress tensor
331
Forces of molecular interaction between solid bodies The general formula
338
Forces of molecular interaction between solid bodies Limiting cases
342
Asymptotic behaviour of the correlation function in a liquid
347
Operator expression for the permittivity
350
A degenerate plasma
353
HYDRODYNAMIC FLUCTUATIONS 86 Dynamic form factor of a liquid
360
Summation rules for the form factor
364
Hydrodynamic fluctuations
368
Hydrodynamic fluctuations in an iniinite medium
373
Operator expressions for the transport coefficients
378
Dynamic form factor of a Fermi liquid
380
Index
385
Copyright

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About the author (1980)

Lev Davidovich Landau was born on January 22, 1908 in Baku, U.S.S.R (now Azerbaijan). A brilliant student, he had finished secondary school by the age of 13. He enrolled in the University of Baku a year later, in 1922, and later transferred to the University of Leningrad, from which he graduated with a degree in physics. Landau did graduate work in physics at Leningrad's Physiotechnical Institute, at Cambridge University in England, and at the Institute of Theoretical Physics in Denmark, where he met physicist Neils Bohr, whose work he greatly admired. Landau worked in the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons program during World War II, and then began a teaching career. Considered to be the founder of a whole school of Soviet theoretical physicists, Landau was honored with numerous awards, including the Lenin Prize, the Max Planck Medal, the Fritz London Prize, and, most notably, the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physics, which honored his pioneering work in the field of low-temperature physics and condensed matter, particularly liquid helium. Unfortunately, Landau's wife and son had to accept the Nobel Prize for him; Landau had been seriously injured in a car crash several months earlier and never completely recovered. He was unable to work again, and spent the remainder of his years, until his death in 1968, battling health problems resulting from the accident. Landau's most notable written work is his Course of Theoretical Physics, an eight-volume set of texts covering the complete range of theoretical physics. Like several other of Landau's books, it was written with Evgeny Lifshitz, a favorite student, because Landau himself strongly disliked writing. Some other works include What is Relativity?, Theory of Elasticity, and Physics for Everyone.