A general description of the east coast of Scotland, from Edinburgh to Cullen, in letters (Google eBook)

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Page 103 - An altar of earth thou shalt make unto me, and shalt sacrifice thereon thy burnt offerings, and thy peace offerings, thy sheep, and thine oxen : in all places where I record my name I will come unto thee, and I will bless thee.
Page 77 - Mr Barclay sent the gentleman notice to remove the hut, signifying, that if he did not he would come and throw it down. No regard was paid to the message, on which the colonel called together a few of his tenants, and went to the spot. The other gentleman had heard of his intention, and came also, fully prepared to oppose force to force.
Page 76 - ... that I feed and pay thee to do my work in a proper manner, but thou art wise in thine own eyes, and regardest not the admonitions of thy employer. I have hitherto spoken to thee in a style thou understandest not, for verily thou art of a perverse spirit ; I wish to correct thy errors, for my own sake, and for thine, and therefore thus tell thee (coming over his head with a blow which brought him to the ground) that I am thy master, and will be obeyed...
Page 121 - ... the four town's ministers, and their successors in their respective offices, the sum of 10,000 sterling, or such sum or sums as his effects might amount to at his death, in trust for erecting and maintaining an hospital, to be called Robert Gordon's Hospital, for educating and maintaining indigent...
Page 77 - ... weapon was carnal, this was the demonstration of power, and had the desired effect ; the ploughman became tractable and quiet as a lamb. Of however little value we may think the property of a few hundred yards of a barren mountain, in former ages great disputes have arisen, and much blood has been shed, in regard to the marchline of the different heritors, which is commonly marked out by cairns, or large stones, the bearings of which are marked down in writing, and. in case of encroachment, the...
Page 76 - that I feed and pay thee to do my work in a proper manner, but thou art wise in thine own eyes, and regardest not the admonitions of thy employer. I have hitherto spoken to thee in a style thou understandest not, for verily thou art of a perverse spirit ; I wish to correct thy errors, for my own sake, and for thine, and therefore thus tell thee (coming over his head with...
Page 115 - He was brought alive to Aberdeen, but died soon after his arrival, and could give no account of himself. He is supposed to have come from the Labrador Coast, and to have lost his way at sea. The canoe is covered with fish skins, curiously stretched upon slight timbers, very securely joined together. The upper part of it is about twenty inches broad at the centre, and runs off gradually to a point at both ends. Where broadest, there is a circular hole, just large enough for the man to fit in, round...
Page 77 - I have long ago renounced the wrathful principle, and wish not to quarrel with anybody; but if thou hast a right to build within the march-line between us here, it is but extending that right, to build within my arable fields, which are also uninclosed. Let our people stand by, while thou and I throw down this hut, injurious to my property, and of no consequence to thee.
Page 76 - VALIANT QUAKER. David Barclay, of Mathers, the " Apologist's " father, served as a colonel under the great Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, and when the troubles broke out in Charles the First's time, did not remain neuter. In that fluctuating period he became a quaker, and, when he retired to live upon his estate, wished to improve his farm. But as he knew nothing of agriculture, he was obliged to trust all to his servants. Having discovered that he had an unskilful ploughman, he was at much pains...
Page 121 - Menzies being always preferred to any others), and the male children of any relations of the Mortifier, that are of any other name, in the third place, to be preferred to others ; and then the male children or male grand-children of any other merchants and brethren of guild of the said burgh.

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