The Civil War

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1960 - History - 382 pages
18 Reviews
Infinitely readable and absorbing, Bruce Catton's The Civil War is one of the best-selling, most widely read general histories of the war available in a single volume. Newly introduced by the critically acclaimed Civil War historian James M. McPherson, The Civil War vividly traces one of the most moving chapters in American history, from the early division between the North and the South to the final surrender of Confederate troops. Catton's account of battles is carefully interwoven with details about the political activities of the Union and Confederate armies and diplomatic efforts overseas. This new edition of The Civil War is a must-have for anyone interested in the war that divided America.
  

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Review: The Civil War (American Heritage)

User Review  - Kbarr77 - Goodreads

A good brief overview of the war by one of the very best civil war writers/historians. Read full review

Review: The Civil War (American Heritage)

User Review  - matt - Goodreads

Good, solid, brief but quite readable account of the Civil War for people (like me) who are interested in the topic but are't well-versed or quite ready to handle a multi-volume epic like Shelby Foote's... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
n The Opening Guns
22
The Clash of Amateur Armies
36
Real Warfare Begins
52
The Navies
68
Confederate HighWater Mark
84
A Search for Allies
98
Stalemate East and West
110
The Northern Vise Tightens
186
The Politics of War
202
The Forlorn Hope
232
Victory
246
xvm End and Beginning
262
Sound of Distant Drums
276
Index to the Chronology
305
The Leading Participants
323

Two Economies at War
156
The Destruction of Slavery
172
Picture Credits
351
Copyright

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About the author (1960)

Bruce Catton, whose complete name was Charles Bruce Catton, was born in Petoskey, Michigan, on October 9, 1899. A United States journalist and writer, Catton was one of America's most popular Civil War historians. Catton worked as a newspaperman in Boston, Cleveland, and Washington, and also held a position at the U.S. Department of Commerce in 1948. Catton's best-selling book, A Stillness at Appomattox, a recount of the most spectacular conflicts between Generals Grant and Lee in the final year of the Civil War, earned him a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award in 1954. In 1977, the year before his death, Catton received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, from President Gerald R. Ford, who noted that the author and historian "made us hear the sounds of battle and cherish peace." Before his death in 1978, Catton wrote a total of ten books detailing the Civil War, including his last, Grant Takes Command. Since 1984, the Bruce Catton Prize was awarded for lifetime achievement in the writing of history. In cooperation with American Heritage Publishing Company, the Society of American Historians in 1984 initiated the biennial prize that honors an entire body of work. It is named for Bruce Catton, prizewinning historian and first editor of American Heritage magazine. The prize consisted of a certificate and 2,500 dollars.

James M. McPherson is the author of Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which won a Pulitzer Prize in history, and For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War, a Lincoln Prize winner. He is the George Henry Davis Professor of American History at Princeton University in New Jersey, where he also lives. His newest book, entitled Abraham Lincoln, celebrates the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth with a short, but detailed look at this president's life.

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