Transactions of the Illinois Natural History Society (Google eBook)

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1861 - Natural history - 194 pages
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Page 173 - There is no exception to the rule that every organic being naturally increases at so high a rate that, if not destroyed, the earth would soon be covered by the progeny of a single pair.
Page 15 - SOCIETY," and by that name and style shall have perpetual succession, and shall have power to contract and be contracted with, to sue and be sued...
Page 88 - ... and claypits into villages and cities. I mean also to include such a cultivation of the intellect, as shall enable it to discover those permanent and mighty laws which pervade all parts of the created universe, whether material or spiritual. This is necessary, because, if we act in obedience to these laws, all the resistless forces of Nature become our auxiliaries and cheer us on to certain prosperity and triumph ; but if we act in contravention or defiance of these laws, then Nature resists,...
Page 173 - A struggle for existence inevitably follows from the high rate at which all organic beings tend to increase. Every being, which during its natural lifetime produces several eggs or seeds, must suffer destruction during some period of its life, and during some season or occasional year, otherwise, on the principle of geometrical increase, its numbers would quickly become so inordinately great that no country could support the product. Hence, as more individuals are produced than can possibly...
Page 22 - Money, consisting of the precious metals: this we have found to be admirably adapted to the wants of trade, except that, for large exchanges, it is too cumbersome, requiring much labor and time in use. 2d, Inconvertible paper, or credit currency, which, we have seen, never has been, and in the nature of things never can be kept at par with coin, and is therefore highly injurious when introduced into commerce. 3d, A mixed currency, or partly convertible paper, which, as it is constantly varying in...
Page 14 - ... collections of specimens ; attend to exchanges with various Societies ; establish a system of co-operation, and labor to incite a general interest in the study of Natural History. ART. VII. All specimens shall be labeled, registered and deposited in the Museum of the State Normal University. ART. VIII. Any resident of the State of Illinois may become a member of this Society on the payment of five dollars, if elected by a majority of the members present at any regular meeting, provided...
Page 61 - The whole number of teeth is 24, of which rarely more than 8 are in use at one time; they are developed from behind forward in order to relieve the jaws from the excessive weight of the whole at one time; the outer edge of the upper teeth projects beyond that of the lower. Two on each side in each jaw are developed soon after...
Page 15 - Martin, and their associates, successors and assigns, are hereby created a body corporate and politic, under the name and style of "The Alton and Sangamon Railroad Company...
Page 87 - I hardly need to say, that by the word Education, I mean much more than an ability to read, write, and keep common accounts. I comprehend, under this noble word, such a training of the body as shall build it up with robustness and vigor, at once protecting it from disease, and enabling it to act, formatively, upon the crude substances of nature, to turn a wilderness into cultivated fields, forests into ships, or quarries and clay-pits into villages and cities. I mean also to include such...
Page 104 - ... etc. But in the Articulates this symmetry is extended even to some of these internal organs. 388. The Articulata are commonly divided into seven classes. 1. Insects. These have the three divisions of the body, the head, the thorax or chest, and the abdomen. They have antennae or feelers on the head, three pairs of legs, and generally one or two pairs of wings. 2. Myriapoda, the Centipedes. They have no separation of the body into thorax and abdomen. The head, however, is very distinct. There...

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