Caruso's Method of Voice Production: The Scientific Culture of the Voice (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton, 1922 - Singing - 308 pages
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Review: Caruso's Method of Voice Production: The Scientific Culture of the Voice

User Review  - Meghan - Goodreads

Interesting but obviously dated in some ways. I would recommend it to anyone interested in vocal pedagogy and wants a different perspective. Read full review

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Page 198 - ... their speech is to be fashioned to a distinct and clear pronunciation, as near as may be to the Italian, especially in the vowels. For we Englishmen being far northerly, do not open our mouths in the cold air, wide enough to grace a southern tongue ; but are observed by all other nations to speak exceeding close and inward; so that to smatter Latin with an English mouth, is as ill a hearing as law French.
Page 182 - ... the meaning of their speeches, and thus the character of any role entrusted to them strikes their minds in none but general hazy outlines, after the manner of certain operatic commonplaces. In their consequent frenzied hunt for something to please, they light at last on stronger tones (Tonaccente) strewn here and there, on which they rush with panting breath as best they can, and end by thinking they have sung quite 'dramatically' if they bellow out the phrase's closing note with an emphatic...
Page 196 - IT is generally admitted that the Anglo-Saxon race, The English ' voice. now the majority of the population of Great Britain, are less gifted vocally have the vocal apparatus naturally in less perfection, and artificially in worse order than any other variety of Indo-Europeans. As a rule, the English voice, if not always of inferior quality, is almost always, in intensity or capacity, inferior to (for instance) the Italian, the German, or the Welsh.
Page 158 - ... process of respiration and are vital factors in the matter of controlling the supply which supports the tone. The diaphragm is really like a pair of bellows and serves exactly the same purpose. It is this ability to take in an adequate supply of breath and to retain it until required that makes or, by contrary, mars all singing. A singer with a perfect sense of pitch and all the good intentions possible will often sing off the key and bring forth a tone with no vitality to it, distressing to...
Page 157 - To have the attack true and pure one must consciously try to open the throat not only in front, but from behind, for the throat is the door through which the voice must pass...
Page 197 - Welsh language looks, chap. i. made up of consonants, and these hardly distinguishable from one another. As a rule, our speech is wanting both in resonance and distinctness. We reduce to a minimum the sonority of our vowels, and omit or amalgamate with one another half of our consonants. Incompetent readers, slovenly speakers, and illiterate singers are of course ready at all times to shift the responsibility for these shortcomings from themselves to the language which they habitually disfigure or...
Page 158 - The tone once launched, one must think how it may be properly sustained, and this is where the art of breathing is most concerned. The lungs, in the first place, should be thoroughly filled. A tone begun with only half-filled lungs loses half its authority and is very apt to be false in pitch. To take a full breath properly, the chest must be raised at the same moment that the abdomen sinks in. Then with the gradual expulsion of the breath a contrary movement takes place. The diaphragm and elastic...
Page 182 - Gesangsbewegung) to his consciousness by getting him to take in one breath, with perfectly even intonation, the calmer, lengthier periods on which he formerly had expended a number of gusty respirations ; when this had been well done I left it to his natural feeling to give the melodic...
Page 208 - All of these unnecessary efforts create the sensation of an obstacle in the throat which hinders the free delivery of the speech; and once that sensation is perceived, instinct suggests a manner of compensating, by augmenting the pressure and amount of breath, which, instead of relieving the strained function of the vocal organs, adds a new element of artificial nature. The average individual gets accustomed to this mechanism, which establishes the incorrect habit of making force the principal element...
Page 158 - Singers, especially tenors, are very apt to throw the head forward in producing the high notes, and consequently get that throaty, strained voice which is so disagreeable. To avoid this one should try to keep the supply of breath down as far toward the abdomen as possible, thus maintaining the upper passages to the head quite free for the emission of the voice.

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