The Cambridge History of English Literature, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sir Adolphus William Ward, Alfred Rayney Waller
G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1909 - English literature
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 260 - I chose the historye of King Arthure, as most fitte for the excellency of his person, being made famous by many mens former workes, and also furthest from the daunger of envy, and suspition of present time.
Page 267 - ... loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom. The unbought grace of life, the cheap defence of nations, the nurse of manly sentiment and heroic enterprise, is gone ! It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that chastity of honour, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage while it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and...
Page 294 - Petrarch's sonneteering disciples multiplied greatly at the end of the fifteenth and the beginning of the sixteenth century ; and the French innovators detected in the rejuvenated Italian sonnet a potent influence of domestic regeneration.
Page 284 - At the end of the fifteenth and the beginning of the sixteenth century, society was in a state of excitement.
Page 306 - He cursed Petrarch for redacting verses into sonnets, which he said was like that tyrant's bed, where some who were too short were racked, others too long cut short.
Page 464 - That he was meditating the number and nature of angels, and their blessed obedience and order, without which, peace could not be in heaven; and, oh, that it might be so on earth!
Page 260 - The generall end therefore of all the booke is to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline : Which for that I conceived shoulde be most plausible and pleasing, being coloured with an historicall fiction, the which the most part of men delight to read, rather for variety of matter then for profite of the ensample...
Page 260 - I have followed all the antique Poets historicall ; first Homere, who in the Persons of Agamemnon and Ulysses hath ensampled a good governour and a vertuous man, the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis : then Virgil, whose like intention was to doe in the person of Aeneas...
Page 187 - Songes and Sonettes, •written by the ryght honorable Lorde Henry Haward, late Earle of Surrey, and other.
Page 470 - What these elements are in themselves it skilleth not, it is enough that to me which take them they are the body and blood of Christ, His promise in witness hereof sufficeth, His word He knoweth which way to accomplish ; why should any cogitation possess the mind of a faithful communicant but this, ' 0 my God thou art true ! O my soul thou art happy...

Bibliographic information