The Reel Civil War: Mythmaking in American Film (Google eBook)

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Aug 19, 2009 - Performing Arts - 345 pages
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During the late nineteenth century, magazines, newspapers, novelists, and even historians presented a revised version of the Civil War that, intending to reconcile the former foes, downplayed the issues of slavery and racial injustice, and often promoted and reinforced the worst racial stereotypes. The Reel Civil War tells the history of how these misrepresentations of history made their way into movies.

More than 800 films have been made about the Civil War. Citing such classics as Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind as well as many other films, Bruce Chadwick shows how most of them have, until recently, projected an image of gallant soldiers, beautiful belles, sprawling plantations, and docile or dangerous slaves. He demonstrates how the movies aided and abetted racism and an inaccurate view of American history, providing a revealing and important account of the power of cinema to shape our understanding of historical truth.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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The reel Civil War: mythmaking in American film

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As a lecturer on history and film at Rutgers and the author of three books on the Civil War (including Brother Against Brother), Chadwick is well suited to his subject. He charts the resiliency of ... Read full review

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
CHAPTER NINE
CHAPTER TEN
CHAPTER ELEVEN
CHAPTER TWELVE
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY

CHAPTER SEVEN
CHAPTER EIGHT

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Bruce Chadwick, Ph.D., lectures on history and film at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He also teaches writing at New Jersey City University. Previously, he had a long career in journalism, writing on arts and entertainment, a column on trends in American culture–including literature, film, dance, theatre and opera–and features and many columns on sports. Eventually he became an editor at the New York Daily News. He lives in New Jersey with his wife.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Bibliographic information