Veterinary Toxicology: Basic and Clinical Principles (Google eBook)

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Ramesh C. Gupta
Academic Press, Apr 28, 2011 - Medical - 1224 pages
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Veterinary Toxicology, 2nd edition is a unique single reference that teaches the basic principles of veterinary toxicology and builds upon these principles to offer an essential clinical resource for those practicing in the field. This reference book is thoroughly updated with new chapters and the latest coverage of topics that are essential to research veterinary toxicologists, students, professors, clinicians and environmentalists. Key areas include melamine and cyanuric acid, toxicogenomics, veterinary medical geology, toxic gases, toxicity and safety evaluation of new veterinary pharmaceuticals and much more. The 2nd edition of this popular book represents the collective wisdom of leading contributors worldwide and continues to fill an undeniable need in the literature relating to veterinary toxicology.

  • New chapters covering important and timely topics such as melamine and cyanuric acid, toxicogenomics, toxic gases and veterinary medical geology
  • Expanded look at international topics, such as epidemiology of animal poisonings, regulatory guidelines and poisonous plants in Europe
  • Heavily contributed book with chapters written by qualified and well-experienced authorities across all areas of veterinary toxicology
  • Problem solving strategies are offered for treatment as well as in-depth knowledge of the basic mechanisms of veterinary toxicology
  

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Contents

Part 2 Organ Toxicity
127
Part 3 Nanoparticles Radiation and Carcinogenesis
303
Part 4 Drugs of Use and Abuse
361
Part 5 Metals and Micronutrients
411
Part 6 Insecticides and Molluscicides
475
Part 7 Rodenticides and Avicides
523
Part 8 Herbicides and Fungicides
565
Part 9 Industrial Toxicants
603
Part 12 Poisonous and Venomous Organisms
775
Part 13 Estrogenic Toxicants
809
Part 14 Poisonous Plants
823
Part 15 Mycotoxins
937
Part 16 Feed and Water Contaminants
1019
Part 17 Diagnostic Toxicology
1061
Part 18 Therapeutic Measures
1137
Index
1159

Part 10 Environmental Toxicology
661
Part 11 Bacterial Toxins
753
Color plates
1203
Copyright

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Page 117 - Just when a scientific principle or discovery crosses the line between the experimental and demonstrable stages is difficult to define. Somewhere in this twilight zone the evidential force of the principle must be recognized, and while courts will go a long way in admitting expert testimony deduced from a well-recognized scientific principle or discovery, the thing from which the deduction is made must be sufficiently established to have gained general acceptance in the particular field in which...
Page 116 - If scientific, technical, or other specialized knowledge will assist the trier of fact to understand the evidence or to determine a fact in issue, a witness qualified as an expert by knowledge, skill, experience, training, or education, may testify thereto in the form of an opinion or otherwise...
Page 106 - refer to airborne concentrations of substances and represent conditions under which it is believed that nearly all workers may be repeatedly exposed day after day without adverse effect.
Page 65 - T., and Gordon, J. (1979) Electrophoretic transfer of proteins from polyacrylamide gels to nitrocellulose sheets: procedure and some applications.
Page 116 - Bases of Opinion Testimony by Experts The facts or data in the particular case upon which an expert bases an opinion or inference may be those perceived by or made known to the expert at or before the hearing. If of a type reasonably relied upon by experts in the particular field in forming opinions or inferences upon the subject, the facts or data need not be admissible in evidence in order for the opinion or inference to be admitted.
Page 117 - The expert may testify in terms of opinion or inference and give his reasons therefor without prior disclosure of the underlying facts or data, unless the court requires otherwise. The expert may in any event be required to disclose the underlying facts or data on cross-examination.
Page 116 - Rule 602. Lack of Personal Knowledge A witness may not testify to a matter unless evidence is introduced sufficient to support a finding that the witness has personal knowledge of the matter. Evidence to prove personal knowledge may, but need not, consist of the witness
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Page 114 - These rules apply to the United States district courts, the District Court of Guam, the District Court of the Virgin Islands, the District Court for the District of the Canal Zone, the...
Page 115 - The requirement of authentication or identification as a condition precedent to admissibility is satisfied by evidence sufficient to support a finding that the matter in question is what its proponent claims.

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