American Racist: The Life and Films of Thomas Dixon

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University Press of Kentucky, Sep 10, 2004 - History - 242 pages
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Between 1965, when President Lyndon B. Johnson defined affirmative action as a legitimate federal goal, and 1972, when President Richard M. Nixon named one of affirmative action's chief antagonists the head of the Department of Labor, government officials at all levels addressed racial economic inequality in earnest. Providing members of historically disadvantaged groups an equal chance at obtaining limited and competitive positions, affirmative action had the potential to alienate large numbers of white Americans, even those who had viewed school desegregation and voting rights in a positive light. Thus, affirmative action was -- and continues to be -- controversial.

Novel in its approach and meticulously researched, David Hamilton Golland's Constructing Affirmative Action: The Struggle for Equal Employment Opportunity bridges a sizeable gap in the literature on the history of affirmative action. Golland examines federal efforts to diversify the construction trades from the 1950s through the 1970s, offering valuable insights into the origins of affirmative action--related policy. Constructing Affirmative Action analyzes how community activism pushed the federal government to address issues of racial exclusion and marginalization in the construction industry with programs in key American cities.

  

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Contents

The Life Worth Living
13
Southern History on the Printed Page
25
Southern History on Stage
51
Southern History on Film
71
The Fall of a Nation
89
The Foolish Virgin and the New Woman
105
Dixon on Socialism
117
The Red Scare
127
Journeyman Filmmaker
153
Nation Aflame
167
The Final Years
185
Raymond Rohauer and the Dixon Legacy
195
Filmography
209
Notes
213
Bibliography
227
Index
233

Miscegenation
143

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About the author (2004)

Anthony Slide is the author or editor of some sixty books on the history of popular entertainment, & editor of the "Filmmakers" series published by Scarecrow Press. He has served as an associate archivist of the American Film Institute & resident film historian of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. In 1990, in recognition of his work on the history of popular culture, Mr. Slide was awarded an honorary doctorate of letters by Bowling Green University. Anthony Slide resides in Studio City, California.

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