The Classic Slave Narratives

Front Cover
Henry Louis Gates (Jr.)
Signet Classics, Jan 1, 2002 - Fiction - 672 pages
42 Reviews
No group of slaves anywhere, in any era, has left such prolific testimony to the horror of bondage as African-American slaves. Here are four of the most notable narratives: The Life of Olaudah Equiano; The History of Mary Prince; Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass; and Incidents in the Life of Slave Girl.



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Review: The Classic Slave Narratives

User Review  - Alex Suarez - Goodreads

I only read Douglass' narrative and Gates Jr.'s introduction. I read it for a class. Definitely helped inform my view of 19th century American slavery and the massive neglect and dehumanization of a people group even by Christians. Read full review

Review: The Classic Slave Narratives

User Review  - Susan Fair - Goodreads

I can't recommend enough that everyone read slave narratives. If you're ever feeling sorry for yourself, you'll find yourself thinking of Frederick Douglass sleeping on a dirt floor with no blanket ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. was born on September 16, 1950, in Keyser, West Virginia. He received a degree in history from Yale University in 1973 and a Ph.D. from Clare College, which is part of the University of Cambridge in 1979. He is a leading scholar of African-American literature, history, and culture. He began working on the Black Periodical Literature Project, which uncovered lost literary works published in 1800s. He rediscovered what is believed to be the first novel published by an African-American in the United States. He republished the 1859 work by Harriet E. Wilson, entitled Our Nig, in 1983. He has written numerous books including Colored People: A Memoir, A Chronology of African-American History, The Future of the Race, Black Literature and Literary Theory, and The Signifying Monkey: Towards a Theory of Afro-American Literary Criticism. In 1991, he became the head of the African-American studies department at Harvard University. He is now the director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African-American Research at the university. He wrote and produced several documentaries including Wonders of the African World, America Beyond the Color Line, and African American Lives. He has also hosted PBS programs such as Wonders of the African World, Black in Latin America, and Finding Your Roots.

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