The Light Course: First Course in Natural Science : Light, Color, Sound--mass, Electricity, Magnetism (Google eBook)

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SteinerBooks, 2001 - Science - 207 pages
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"Now the time has actually arrived when ... we have a subconscious glimmering of the impossibility of the modern approach to nature and some sense that things have to change." - Rudolf SteinerRudolf Steiner's course on light, which includes explorations of color, sound, mass, electricity and magnetism, presages the dawn of a new world view in the natural sciences that will stand our notion of the physical world on its head.This "first course" in natural science, given to the teachers of the new Stuttgart Waldorf School as an inspiration for developing the physics curriculum, is based on Goethe's phenomenological approach to the study of nature. Acknowledging that modern physicists had come to regard Goethe's ideas on physics as a "kind of nonsense," Steiner contrasts the traditional scientific approach, which treats phenomena as evidence of "natural laws," with Goethean science, which rejects the idea of an abstract law behind natural phenomena and instead seeks to be a "rational description of nature." Steiner then corrects the mechanistic reductionism practiced by scientific positivists, emphasizing instead the validity of human experience and pointing toward a revolution in scientific paradigms that would reclaim ground for the subject-the human being-in the study of nature.
  

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Contents

Translators Introduction
7
SECOND LECTURE
33
THIRD LECTURE
51
FOURTH LECTURE
69
FIFTH LECTURE
85
SEVENTH LECTURE
111
EIGHTH LECTURE
124
NINTH LECTURE
138
TENTH LECTURE
155
DISCUSSION STATEMENT
173
Notes
186
The Foundations of Waldorf Education
203
Copyright

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Page 10 - Human beings are creating a world that is increasingly inhospitable to themselves or anything else alive. The empathetic basis on which we relate to nature is eroded, as is that on which we relate to each other and to our own selves. Our impotence to reverse these trends derives from our unquestioning acceptance of the
Page 11 - such methods are logically necessary. Reductionists are convinced that objective knowledge can be gained by no other means. However, built into these methods is the unsupported presupposition of a
Page 11 - that, in its finality, is static, fragmented, and impersonal. Within such a reality there is no place for life or sentient

About the author (2001)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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