Child Welfare Revisited: An Africentric Perspective

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Joyce Everett, Sandra Stukes Chipungu, Bogart R. Leashore
Rutgers University Press, 2004 - Political Science - 294 pages
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Why are there proportionally more African American children in foster care than white children? Why are white children often readily adoptable, while African American children are difficult to place? Are these imbalances an indication of institutional racism or merely a coincidence?

In this revised and expanded edition of the classic volume, Child Welfare, twenty-one educators call attention to racial disparities in the child welfare system by demonstrating how practices that are successful for white children are often not similarly successful for African American children. Moreover, contributors insist that policymakers and care providers look at African American family life and child-development from a culturally-based Africentric perspective. Such a perspective, the book argues, can serve as a catalyst for creativity and innovation in the formulation of policies and practices aimed at improving the welfare of African American children.

Child Welfare Revisited offers new chapters on the role of institutional racism and economics on child welfare; the effects of substance abuse, homelessness, HIV/AIDS, and domestic violence; and the internal strengths and challenges that are typical of African American families. Bringing together timely new developments and information, this book will continue to be essential reading for all child welfare policymakers and practitioners.

  

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Contents

Introduction
1
PART
11
Institutional Racism in Child Welfare
57
The Impact of Child Welfare Policies
77
PART
89
ChildRearing Practices in African American Families
145
Best Practices in Kinship Care for African
156
Unwed African American Fathers Participation in Child
169
PART THREE
193
An Africentric Paradigm for Child Welfare Practice
214
Family Preservation and NeighborhoodBased
225
A Culturally Competent System of Care for Addressing
242
African American Adoptions
256
Still Within Our Power
275
Contributors
281
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Sandra S. Chipungu is an associate professor and associate dean at Howard University School of Social Work.

Bogart R. Leashore is the former dean of the Hunter College School of Social Work.

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