Blue-Collar Hollywood: Liberalism, Democracy, and Working People in American Film

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JHU Press, Apr 4, 2003 - History - 284 pages
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From Tom Joad to Norma Rae to Spike Lee's Mookie in Do the Right Thing, Hollywood has regularly dramatized the lives and struggles of working people in America. Ranging from idealistic to hopeless, from sympathetic to condescending, these portrayals confronted audiences with the vital economic, social, and political issues of their times while providing a diversion—sometimes entertaining, sometimes provocative—from the realities of their own lives.

In Blue-Collar Hollywood, John Bodnar examines the ways in which popular American films made between the 1930s and the 1980s depicted working-class characters, comparing these cinematic representations with the aspirations of ordinary Americans and the promises made to them by the country's political elites. Based on close and imaginative viewings of dozens of films from every genre—among them Public Enemy, Black Fury, Baby Face, The Grapes of Wrath, It's a Wonderful Life, I Married a Communist, A Streetcar Named Desire, Peyton Place, Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Coal Miner's Daughter, and Boyz N the Hood—this book explores such topics as the role of censorship, attitudes toward labor unions and worker militancy, racism, the place of women in the workforce and society, communism and the Hollywood blacklist, and faith in liberal democracy.

Whether made during the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, or the Vietnam era, the majority of films about ordinary working Americans, Bodnar finds, avoided endorsing specific political programs, radical economic reform, or overtly reactionary positions. Instead, these movies were infused with the same current of liberalism and popular notion of democracy that flow through the American imagination.

  

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Blue-collar Hollywood: liberalism, democracy, and working people in American film

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Bodnar (history, Indiana Univ., Bloomington; Remaking America: Public Memory, Commemoration, and Patriotism) here describes and analyzes cinematic renderings of individualism, capitalism, and ... Read full review

Contents

Political Crossdressing in the Thirties
1
The Peoples War
55
War and Peace at Home
87
Beyond Containment in the Fifties
133
The People in Turmoil
177
A Conclusion
219
Notes
229
Sources
257
Index
277
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About the author (2003)

John Bodnar is Chancellor's Professor of History at Indiana University, Bloomington, and author of numerous books, including Remaking America: Public Memory, Commemoration, and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century.

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