The Autobiography of Malcolm X

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Ballantine Books, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 460 pages
1712 Reviews
Through a life of passion and struggle, Malcolm X became one of the most influential figures of the 20th Century. In this riveting account, he tells of his journey from a prison cell to Mecca, describing his transition from hoodlum to Muslim minister. Here, the man who called himself "the angriest Black man in America" relates how his conversion to true Islam helped him confront his rage and recognize the brotherhood of all mankind.
An established classic of modern America, "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" was hailed by the New York Times as "Extraordinary. A brilliant, painful, important book." Still extraordinary, still important, this electrifying story has transformed Malcom X's life into his legacy. The strength of his words, the power of his ideas continue to resonate more than a generation after they first appeared.

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So rewarding good history and good writing - Goodreads
Wow, was this ever hard to read. - Goodreads
Very powerful, interesting, and educational book. - Goodreads
It makes this book difficult to read at times. - Goodreads
A really interesting insight into a complex character. - Goodreads
Bluntly honest and excellent intro and epilogue. - Goodreads
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AMAZING!!! I have read a lot of books in my day and this is simply an excellent depiction of his life and times! A man that, in the end, was never really fully realized in regard to his exceptional potential. In addition, Alex Haley's epilogue is equally as important as the main character's life story! I suggest it is read cover to cover!!! 

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User Review  - Noellie - Goodreads

Upon recommendation by a human rights and environmental protection blogger that I have grown to respect and adore I decided to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X. He's always going on and on about ... Read full review

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Contents

II
1
III
24
IV
41
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

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References from web pages

The Official Web Site of Malcolm X
CMG Worldwide - Malcolm X was an intransigent opponent of the US government and its imperialist policies
www.cmgww.com/ historic/ malcolm/

The Autobiography of Malcolm X « Colony Library Lady
We often hear of Malcolm X and his militancy, but The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley helps the reader understand where Malcolm X came from, ...
colonylibrarylady.com/ 2007/ 11/ 01/ the-autobiography-of-malcolm-x/

Malcolm X
The Autobiography of Malcolm X, based on interviews he had given to the journalist, Alex Haley, was published in 1965. Forum Debates ...
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/ USAmalcolmX.htm

The Autobiography of Malcolm X « TGAW
Some quotes from The Autobiography of Malcolm X (most from Chapter 11 - Saved) on his prison experiences:. Effect of Prison Studies ...
tgaw.wordpress.com/ category/ authors/ the-autobiography-of-malcolm-x/

Making Race Real: Using The Autobiography of Malcolm X to Teach ...
While Misra (2000) argues that the success of introductory sociology classes hinges on making concepts lively and “real ” many students find introductory ...
www.allacademic.com/ meta/ p182700_index.html

The Autobiography of Malcolm X Summary, Analysis, and Term Paper ...
The Autobiography of Malcolm X summary and analysis of the work. Links to help for term papers, essays, and tests.
www.owleyes.org/ tph.php?url_code=autobiography-malcolm

Academy of Achievement: The Autobiography of Malcolm X
"My interest in Islam started when I was a freshman at UCLA and I got the opportunity to read The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and it really made me ...
www.achievement.org/ autodoc/ bibliography/ Autobiogra_0

The Autobiography Of Malcolm X Teaching Guide
The Autobiography of Malcolm X is an opportunity to observe many examples of human strengths. The children of the Little family survived in spite of the ...
www.brothermalcolm.net/ archivedsites/ randomhouse-tgs_malcolmx.htm

sparknotes: The Autobiography Of Malcolm X: Analysis of Major ...
The Autobiography Of Malcolm X · African American Literature · The Civil Rights Movement (1954-1968). sparkcharts. Literary Terms · African-American History ...
www.sparknotes.com/ lit/ malcolmx/ canalysis.html

Siegmund's English Weblog: The Autobiography of Malcolm X p 179 - 318
The Autobiography of Malcolm X p 179 - 318. Once Malcolm gets out of prison, he begins to meet personally with Elijah Muhammad, and eventually becomes one ...
siegmund-siegmund.blogspot.com/ 2007/ 06/ autobiography-of-malcolm-x-p-179-318.html

About the author (1999)

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, and the son of a Baptist minister, Malcolm Little grew up with violence. Whites killed several members of his family, including his father. As a youngster, he went to live with a sister in Boston where he started a career of crime that he continued in New York's Harlem as a drug peddler and pimp. While serving a prison term for burglary in 1952, he converted to Islam and undertook an intensive program of study and self-improvement, movingly detailed in "Autobiography of Malcolm X." He wrote constantly to Elijah Muhammad (Elijah Poole, 1897--1975), head of the black separatist Nation of Islam, which already claimed the loyalty of several of his brothers and sisters. Upon release from prison, Little went to Detroit, met with Elijah Muhammad, and dropped the last name Little, adopting X to symbolize the unknown African name his ancestors had been robbed of when they were enslaved. Soon he was actively speaking and organizing as a Muslim minister. In his angry and articulate preaching, he condemned white America for its treatment of blacks, denounced the integration movement as black self-delusion, and advocated black control of black communities. During the turbulent 1960's, he was seen as inflammatory and dangerous. In 1963, a storm broke out when he called President Kennedy's assassination a case of "chickens coming home to roost," meaning that white violence, long directed against blacks, had now turned on itself. The statement was received with fury, and Elijah Muhammad denounced him publicly. Shocked and already disillusioned with the leader because of his reputed involvement with several women, Malcolm X went on a pilgrimage to Mecca and then traveled to several African countries, where he was received as a fellow Muslim. When he returned home, he was bearing a new message: Islam is a religion that welcomes and unites people of all races in the Oneness of Allah. On the night of February 21, 1965, as he was preaching at Harlem's Audubon Ballroom, he was assassinated.

Alex Haley is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece Roots. With Malcolm X, he coauthored the Autobiography of Malcom X. He died in February 1992.
David Stevens is an Oscar-nominated screenwriter who coauthored "Breaker Morant" and directed the Emmy Award-winning miniseries "A Town Like Alice." He has written several other miniseries, including "Merlin," and his off-Broadway play "The Sum of Us" was made into a movie. He worked extensively with Alex Haley on the screenplay "Queen," and after Alex Haley died, he completed the unfinished book.

"From the Paperback edition.