The Autobiography of Malcolm X

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Ballantine Books, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 460 pages
1438 Reviews
Through a life of passion and struggle, Malcolm X became one of the most influential figures of the 20th Century. In this riveting account, he tells of his journey from a prison cell to Mecca, describing his transition from hoodlum to Muslim minister. Here, the man who called himself "the angriest Black man in America" relates how his conversion to true Islam helped him confront his rage and recognize the brotherhood of all mankind.
An established classic of modern America, "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" was hailed by the New York Times as "Extraordinary. A brilliant, painful, important book." Still extraordinary, still important, this electrifying story has transformed Malcom X's life into his legacy. The strength of his words, the power of his ideas continue to resonate more than a generation after they first appeared.

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So rewarding good history and good writing - Goodreads
Wow, was this ever hard to read. - Goodreads
Very powerful, interesting, and educational book. - Goodreads
A really interesting insight into a complex character. - Goodreads
Top of my list - great writing, and better story - Goodreads
This is a nice bit of advice. - Goodreads
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AMAZING!!! I have read a lot of books in my day and this is simply an excellent depiction of his life and times! A man that, in the end, was never really fully realized in regard to his exceptional potential. In addition, Alex Haley's epilogue is equally as important as the main character's life story! I suggest it is read cover to cover!!! 

Review: The Autobiography of Malcolm X

User Review  - Rosaline Martinez - Goodreads

I won't lie, it was a struggle for me to stay interested in this book because I am familiar with Malcolm X's narrative. I've seen Spike Lee's adaptation many times so there were several instances when ... Read full review

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Contents

II
1
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24
IV
41
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, and the son of a Baptist minister, Malcolm Little grew up with violence. Whites killed several members of his family, including his father. As a youngster, he went to live with a sister in Boston where he started a career of crime that he continued in New York's Harlem as a drug peddler and pimp. While serving a prison term for burglary in 1952, he converted to Islam and undertook an intensive program of study and self-improvement, movingly detailed in "Autobiography of Malcolm X." He wrote constantly to Elijah Muhammad (Elijah Poole, 1897--1975), head of the black separatist Nation of Islam, which already claimed the loyalty of several of his brothers and sisters. Upon release from prison, Little went to Detroit, met with Elijah Muhammad, and dropped the last name Little, adopting X to symbolize the unknown African name his ancestors had been robbed of when they were enslaved. Soon he was actively speaking and organizing as a Muslim minister. In his angry and articulate preaching, he condemned white America for its treatment of blacks, denounced the integration movement as black self-delusion, and advocated black control of black communities. During the turbulent 1960's, he was seen as inflammatory and dangerous. In 1963, a storm broke out when he called President Kennedy's assassination a case of "chickens coming home to roost," meaning that white violence, long directed against blacks, had now turned on itself. The statement was received with fury, and Elijah Muhammad denounced him publicly. Shocked and already disillusioned with the leader because of his reputed involvement with several women, Malcolm X went on a pilgrimage to Mecca and then traveled to several African countries, where he was received as a fellow Muslim. When he returned home, he was bearing a new message: Islam is a religion that welcomes and unites people of all races in the Oneness of Allah. On the night of February 21, 1965, as he was preaching at Harlem's Audubon Ballroom, he was assassinated.

Alex Haley is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece Roots. With Malcolm X, he coauthored the Autobiography of Malcom X. He died in February 1992.
David Stevens is an Oscar-nominated screenwriter who coauthored "Breaker Morant" and directed the Emmy Award-winning miniseries "A Town Like Alice." He has written several other miniseries, including "Merlin," and his off-Broadway play "The Sum of Us" was made into a movie. He worked extensively with Alex Haley on the screenplay "Queen," and after Alex Haley died, he completed the unfinished book.

"From the Paperback edition.