Music and Memory: An Introduction

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MIT Press, 2000 - Music - 291 pages
2 Reviews

This far-ranging book shows how human memory influences the organization of music. The book is divided into two parts. The first part presents basic ideas about memory and perception from cognitive psychology and, to some extent, cognitive linguistics. Topics include auditory processing, perception, and recognition. The second part describes in detail how the concepts from the first part are exemplified in music. The presentation is based on three levels of musical experience: event fusion (the formation of single musical events from acoustical vibrations in the air, on a time scale too small to exhibit rhythm), melody and rhythm, and form. The focus in the latter is on the psychological conditions necessary for making large-scale -- that is, formal -- boundaries clear in music rather than on traditional musical forms. The book also discusses the idea that much of the language used to describe musical structures and processes is metaphorical. It encourages readers to consider the possibility that the process of musical composition can be "a metaphorical transformation of their own experience into sound."

The book also touches on unresolved debates about psychological musical universals, information theory, and the operation of neurons. It requires no formal musical training and contains a glossary and an appendix of listening examples.

  

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Review: Music and Memory: An Introduction

User Review  - Ethan - Goodreads

An information-theoretical approach to music, the best account I've seen so far of how it all works. See my own writing on the subject. Read full review

Contents

Auditory Memory An Overview
3
Memory Diagram
5
Level of Event Fusion
12
Level of Melodic and Rhythmic Grouping
13
Level of Form
14
Echoic Memory and Early Processing
19
Representation and Recognition
23
Brain Processes and Musical Time
25
Tuning System
136
Scales
139
Scales and ShortTerm Memory
140
Scales Categories and Nuance
141
Ornamentation
143
Melodic Motion
146
Contour
149
Continuous Contour
150

Grouping
31
Primitive and Learned Grouping
32
Primitive Grouping
33
Grouping and ShortTerm Memory
34
Groupings and Phrases
37
Proximity
39
Similarity
40
Continuity
42
HigherLevel Grouping Factors
43
Set
45
ShortTerm and Working Memory
47
Limitations of ShortTerm Memory
49
Focus of Conscious Awareness
51
Rehearsal
52
Chunking
53
Closure
59
Intensity and Metaphors of Motion and Gravity
62
A Metaphor of Causality
63
Repetition
65
LongTerm Memory
69
Implicit Memory
72
Explicit Memory
74
Categories
81
Perceptual Categories
82
Conceptual Categories
83
Categories and Nuance
85
Nuance and Implicit Memory
87
Schemas Frameworks for Experience and Memory
95
Schematic Organization
97
Schemas and Normalcy
98
Schemas and Music
100
Schemas as Musical Frameworks
101
Schemas and Musical Culture
102
Speculations about Schemas and Perception
103
Metaphor
107
Image Schemas
108
Image Schemas and Music
110
Music and Gravity
111
Cenerality in Music
112
MotionLinkageCausation
113
Paths and Goals
114
Inside and Outside
115
Metaphorical Extension
116
Other Metaphorical Possibilities
117
Some Musical Concepts
121
Event Fusion
123
Pitched Events
124
Pitch Discrimination and Memory
127
Interval
129
A Special Interval
130
Melody
135
Tonality
151
Tonality and Implicit Memory
152
Image Schemas and Melody
154
Melody and the Filling of Gaps
155
Rhythm
159
Rhythm and ShortTerm Memory
161
Beats
162
Pulse
163
Pulse as Temporal Category
165
Tempo
167
Accent
170
Meter
171
Metrical Hierarchy
175
Meter as Temporal Schema
177
Patterns of Time Interval as Rhythmic Categories
180
Rhythmic Contour and Rhythmic Tension
184
More Complex Types of Metrical Tension
185
Extended Meters and LargeScale Metrical Tension
187
Free Rhythm
189
Form
193
Primary Parameters
195
Secondary Parameters
196
Syntax Parameters and Closure
200
Constancy
202
Constancy and Sectional Coherence
203
Information and Redundancy
205
Limits on Patterns
208
Information
209
Redundancy
210
Information Memory and Time
212
Duration
213
Succession
215
Time Order and LongTerm Memory
216
Memory and Hierarchy
217
Hierarchy and Time Order
219
Memory and Association
224
Primacy and Recency
225
Schemas and Time Order
226
Temporal Perspective
228
Continuity Graduated Parametric Motion and Discontinuity
229
Syntax
231
Memory Strategies in Music
234
Strategies for Memory Sabotage
235
LowInformation Strategies
236
Memory Length Strategies
237
Postscript
243
Listening Examples
245
Glossary
255
References
267
Index
283
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