Phonology as Human Behavior: Theoretical Implications and Clinical Applications

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Duke University Press, 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 383 pages
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Phonology as Human Behaviorbrings work in human cognition, behavior, and communication to bear on the study of phonology—the theory of sound systems in language. Yishai Tobin extends the ideas of William Diver—an influential linguist whose investigations into phonology reflect the principle that language represents a constant search for maximum communication with minimal effort—as a part of a new theory of phonology as human behavior. Showing the far-reaching psycho- and sociolinguistic utility of this theory, Tobin demonstrates its applicability to the teaching of phonetics, text analysis, and the theory of language acquisition.
Tobin describes the methodological connection between phonological theory and phonetics by way of a comprehensive and insightful survey of phonology’s controversial role in twentieth-century linguistics. He reviews the work of Saussure, Jakobson, Troubetzkoy, Martinet, Zipf, and Diver, among others, and discusses issues in distributional phonology through analyses of English, Italian, Latin, Hebrew, and Yiddish. Using his theory to explain various functional and pathological speech disorders, Tobin examines a wide range of deviant speech processes in aphasia, the speech of the hearing-impaired, and other syndromes of organic origin.Phonology as Human Behaviorprovides a unique set of principles connecting the phylogeny, ontogeny, and pathology of sound systems in human language.
  

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Contents

Phonetics and Phonology A Historical Overview
1
Theoretical and Methodological Assumptions 3 The Historical Development
18
Phonology as Human Behavior
25
The Fundamental Analytic Position 32 The Analysis 33 Summary
46
The Italian and Latin Connections
53
Combinatory Phonology 53 The Study 56 The Analysis 59 Summary
86
Theoretical and Methodological Background 88 The Triconsonantal CCC
119
Panchronic Applications in Hebrew Phonology
125
Defining Language Disorders 196 The Aims of Clinical Linguistics
200
Phonological Theory and the Speech Clinic 210 Phonology as Human Behavior
215
Summary and Conclusions
250
Audiology and Hearing Impairment 255 The Speech of the Hearing Impaired
270
Cochlear Implants and Phonology as Human Behavior 279 Summary
283
Aphasia and Phonology as Human Behavior 292 Summary
303
Appendices
307
References
337

The StopSpirant Alternation in Hebrew 125 Summary and Conclusions
144
Pedagogical and Textual Applications
145
Language Acquisition and Phonology as Human Behavior 173 The Role
184

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About the author (1997)

Yishai Tobin is Professor of Linguistics Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.

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