Disarmament, economic conversion, and management of peace

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Praeger, 1992 - Business & Economics - 335 pages
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This important volume tackles the potential problems of international military disarmament. Distinguished scholars across several disciplines discuss possible negative economic and social consequences, including unemployment, conversion costs, and the related hampered growth of research and development, associated with the conversion from a military industrial economy to a civilian complex. The authors present techniques for managing sectoral and regional economic imbalances and conclude that disarmament would ultimately release resources for foreign aid to close the gap between the world's haves and have-nots. Divided into three parts (Models of Disarmament and Conflict Analysis, Economic Conversion, and Management of Peace), this volume addresses specific topics such as techniques of management conflict, factors affecting military expenditures, new prospects for an East-West relationship, American strategic policy and NATO, defense expenditure and economic conversion, Third World arms production, and regional conflict in the wake of superpower convergence. These analyses and discussions will be of particular interest to scholars of Peace Studies, Political Science, Economics, Sociology, and Military Studies.

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Contents

Use of Management and Peace Science Techniques
15
A Comparison of Some Analytical Procedures for Nonmetric
41
Models for Projecting EconomicEcologic
59
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

MANAS CHATTERJI is Professor of Management, Adjunct Professor of Economics, and Director of the Griffiss Program at the State University of New York in Binghamton.

LINDA RENNIE FORCEY, Associate Professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton, is coordinator of the Peace Studies Concentration and director of the Peace Studies Education Center at Binghamton.

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