Chasing technoscience: matrix for materiality

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Indiana University Press, 2003 - Philosophy - 249 pages
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"... an original, quirky, and illuminating collection of material concerning the relatively new and exciting field of technoscience studies.... [T]he editors' choice of multiple approaches to the work of four major figures is wholly suited to clarifying their unorthodox and consequently somewhat elusive philosophical positions." -- Robert ScharffAlthough often absent from the considerations of philosophers, sociologists, and anthropologists, the material dimension plays an important and even essential role in the practices of the sciences. Chasing Technoscience: Matrix for Materiality begins to redress this absence by bringing together four prominent figures who make technoscience, or science embodied in its technologies, a central theme of their work. Through lively personal interviews and substantive essays, the ideas of Andrew Pickering, Don Ihde, Donna Haraway, and Bruno Latour are brought to bear on the question of materiality in technoscience. The work of these theorists is then compared and critiqued in essays by colleagues. Chasing Technoscience is a ground-breaking, state-of-the-art look at current developments in technoscience.

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Contents

Interview with Bruno Latour
15
2 The Promises of Constructivism
27
Interview with Donna Haraway
47
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Don Ihde is one of the founders of a distinctly North American approach to phenomenology in work that centers around technology. After completing his B.A. degree at the University of Kansas (1956), he earned a Master of Divinity degree at Andover Newton Theological School (1959) and a Ph.D. at Boston University (1964). His doctoral dissertation on the phenomenology of Paul Ricoeur set the stage for later original contributions to phenomenological analysis. Ihde taught at Southern Illinois University before moving to the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where, since 1969, he has served at different times as Head of Philosophy and Dean of Liberal Arts and Humanities. In the mid-1970s, together with his colleagues at Stony Brook, Ihde developed an intentionally eclectic school of experienced-based "experimental phenomenology" with bridges to pragmatism, which has concentrated on elaborating the ways that instrumentation mediates between human beings and the world. His book Technics and Praxis (1979) was the first real work on the philosophy of technology in English. In 1990 Ihde, together with Indiana University Press, initiated a new monograph series in philosophy of technology that has since become one of the most influential collection of publications in the field.

Don Ihde is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is Director of the Technoscience Research Group at Stony Brook and is affiliated with the History of Science and Women's Studies programs. He is the author of thirteen other books, including Instrumental Realism and Technology and the Lifeworld (both Indiana University Press).Evan Selinger is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, where he is writing his dissertation on the topic of expertise and authority. His publications include "Dreyfus on Expertise: The Limits of Phenomenological Analysis," which appeared in Continental Philosophy Review.

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