Politics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Philosophy
22 Reviews
Aristotle's "Politics" is a treatise on the subject of political science and government and is considered to be one of the greatest works on the subject from classical antiquity. Expounding upon, "The Republic", the earlier work of his teacher Plato, Aristotle examines the various options for governance and their respective values. A detailed and pragmatic approach to the subject, Aristotle's "Politics" provides much of the foundation for modern political thought. Great insight for the modern student of political science can be found in this classic work on the subject.
  

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Review: Politics

User Review  - Maria - Goodreads

Aristotle, as well as Plato, holds that individuals aren't but part of a community, does not give rise to women in public, comparing them with slaves. Justifying slavery with nature, justifying all ... Read full review

Review: Politics

User Review  - Tommy Lee - Goodreads

I have to say I'm a little disappointed. After hearing this work referenced often by those claiming to masters of political science, I am left only to view this as an historical piece and not as ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
3
III
5
V
6
VI
7
VII
8
VIII
9
IX
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X
12
LV
68
LVI
69
LVII
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LVIII
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LIX
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LX
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LXII
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LXIII
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XI
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XIV
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XVI
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XVIII
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XIX
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XXI
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXVIII
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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LI
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LII
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LIII
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LIV
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
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LXXII
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LXXIII
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LXXV
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LXXVI
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LXXVII
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LXXIX
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LXXX
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LXXXI
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LXXXII
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LXXXIII
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LXXXIV
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LXXXV
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LXXXVI
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LXXXVII
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LXXXVIII
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LXXXIX
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XC
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XCI
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XCII
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XCIII
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XCIV
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XCV
124
XCVI
125
XCVII
126
XCVIII
127
XCIX
129
C
130
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

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