Thalaba the Destroyer, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1814
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Page 140 - My brethren have dealt deceitfully as a brook, And as the stream of brooks they pass away; Which are blackish by reason of the ice, And wherein the snow is hid: What time they wax warm, they vanish: When it is hot, they are consumed out of their place.
Page 223 - ... with a majestic slowness ; at intervals we thought they were coming in a very few minutes to overwhelm us ; and small quantities of sand did actually more than once reach us. Again they would retreat so as to be almost out of sight, their tops reaching to the very clouds.
Page 135 - And it came to pass, as they were burying a man, that, behold, they spied a band of men ; and they cast the man into the sepulchre of Elisha : and when the man was let down, and touched the bones of Elisha. he revived, and stood up on his feet.
Page 223 - Eleven of them ranged alongside of us about the distance of three miles. The greatest diameter of the largest appeared to me at that distance as if it would measure ten feet. They retired from us with a wind at SE leaving an impression upon my mind to which I can give no name, though surely one ingredient in it was fear, with a considerable deal of wonder and astonishment.
Page 223 - It was in vain to think of flying; the swiftest horse or fastest sailing ship could be of no use to carry us out of this danger, and the full persuasion of this riveted me as if to the spot where I stood, and let the camels gain on me so much in my state of lameness that it was with some difficulty I could overtake them.
Page 223 - SE leaving an impression upon my mind to which I can give no name, though surely one ingredient in it was fear, with a considerable deal of wonder and astonishment. It was in vain to think of flying ; the swiftest horse, or fastest sailing ship, could be of no use to carry us out of this danger; and the full persuasion of this rivetted me as if to the spot where I stood.
Page 214 - ... a small head without ears, at the end of a long neck without flesh. She has taken from his legs and thighs every muscle not immediately requisite for motion, and in short has bestowed on his withered body only the vessels and tendons necessary to connect its frame together.
Page 124 - Onward they came, a dark continuous cloud Of congregated myriads numberless, The rushing of whose wings was as the sound Of a broad river, headlong in its course Plunged from a mountain summit ; or the roar Of a wild ocean in the autumn storm, Shattering its billows on a shore of rocks.
Page 117 - When the blast is loud ; When the waters fill The traveller's tread in the sands ; When the pouring shower Streams adown the roof; When the door-curtain hangs in heavier folds ; When the out-strain'd tent flags loosely : Within there is the embers' cheerful glow, The sound of the familiar voice, The song that lightens toil, Domestic Peace and Comfort are within.
Page 210 - He had a carpet of green silk on which his throne was placed, being of a prodigious length and breadth, and sufficient for all his forces to stand upon, the men placing themselves on his right hand, and the spirits on his left ; and that when all were in order, the wind, at his command, took up the carpet, and transported it, with all that were upon it, wherever he pleased ; the army of birds at the same time flying over their heads, and forming a kind of canopy to shade them from the sun.

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