The poets of Great Britain complete from Chaucer to Churchill (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1807
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 70 - The praise of Bacchus then the sweet musician sung, Of Bacchus ever fair and ever young: The jolly god in triumph comes; Sound the trumpets, beat the drums...
Page 8 - Less than a God they thought there could not dwell Within the hollow of that shell, That spoke so sweetly and so well. What' passion cannot Music raise and quell ? The trumpet's loud clangor Excites us to arms, With shrill notes of anger, And mortal alarms.
Page 50 - Shadwell alone my perfect image bears, Mature in dulness from his tender years: Shadwell alone, of all my sons, is he Who stands confirm'd in full stupidity. The rest to some faint meaning make pretence, But Shadwell never deviates into sense.
Page 72 - He chose a mournful Muse Soft pity to infuse : He sung Darius great and good, By too severe a fate Fallen, fallen, fallen, fallen...
Page 78 - He is a perpetual fountain of good sense ; learned in all sciences ; and, therefore, speaks properly on all subjects. As he knew what to say, so he knows also when to leave off ; a continence which is practised by few writers, and scarcely by any of the ancients, excepting Virgil and Horace.
Page 38 - She gave but glimpses of her glorious mind : And multitudes of virtues pass'd along ; Each pressing foremost in the mighty throng, Ambitious to be seen, and then make room For greater multitudes that were to come.
Page 96 - I shall say the less of Mr. Collier, because in many things he has taxed me justly ; and I have pleaded guilty to all thoughts and expressions of mine, which can be truly argued of obscenity, profaneness, or immorality; and retract them. If he be my enemy, let him triumph; if he be my friend, as I have given him no personal occasion to be otherwise, he will be glad of my repentance. It becomes me not to draw my pen in the defence of a bad cause, when I have so often drawn it for a good one.
Page 69 - TWAS at the royal feast for Persia won By Philip's warlike son: Aloft in awful state The godlike hero sate On his imperial throne...
Page 134 - Better to hunt in fields for health unbought Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise for cure on exercise depend ; God never made his work for man to mend.
Page 75 - Tale, The Cock and the Fox, which I have translated, and some others, I may justly give our countryman the precedence in that part, since I can remember nothing of Ovid which was wholly his. Both of them understood the manners; under which name I comprehend the passions and, in a larger sense, the descriptions of persons and their very habits.

Bibliographic information