Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome: Innovations in Context

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 8, 2005 - Architecture
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Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome examines methods and techniques that enabled builders to construct some of the most imposing monuments of ancient Rome. Focusing on structurally innovative vaulting and the factors that influenced its advancement, Lynne Lancaster also explores a range of related practices, including lightweight pumice as aggregate, amphoras in vaults, vaulting ribs, metal tie bars, and various techniques of buttressing. She provides the geological background of the local building stones and applies mineralogical analysis to determine material provenance, which in turn suggests trading patterns and land use. Lancaster also examines construction techniques in relation to the social, economic, and political contexts of Rome, in an effort to draw connections between changes in the building industry and the events that shaped Roman society from the early empire to late antiquity. This book was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in 2007.
  

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Contents

I
1
II
2
IV
3
VI
6
VII
10
VIII
12
IX
18
X
21
XXXIX
108
XL
111
XLI
113
XLII
115
XLIII
116
XLIV
118
XLV
126
XLVII
127

XI
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXV
88
XXXVI
91
XXXVII
98
XXXVIII
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XLVIII
130
XLIX
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L
134
LI
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LII
146
LIII
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LIV
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LVI
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LVII
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LVIII
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LIX
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LX
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LXI
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LXII
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LXIII
183
LXIV
205
LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
247
LXIX
252
LXX
267
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About the author (2005)

Lynne Lancaster is Associate Professor of Classics at Ohio University. A scholar of Roman archaeology and architecture, she has been awarded fellowships from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the M. Aylwin Cotton Foundation, and the American Academy in Rome.

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