A Social Study of the Russian German (Google eBook)

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University of Nebraska., 1916 - Germans - 101 pages
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Page 101 - Birth Registration; an aid In protecting the lives and rights of children ; necessity for extending the registration area.
Page 68 - ... garbage deposits from their midst. How much harm results from water standing in cellars of the homes where there is no drainage, cannot be said ; and though it is probably never the direct cause of death, it undoubtedly lowers the vitality of those who live in such 51 Newman, Infant Mortality, 45. 52 Duke, " Infant Mortality, Results of a Field Study in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, Based on Births in One Calendar Year," 37, in United States Department of Labor, Children's Bureau, Infant Mortality...
Page 24 - SETTLEMENTS 8.5 per cent. are of this size. The " summer kitchens " are differentiated from dwellings of the same size because they always indicate two houses on a lot and mean more crowding than the single dwellings. The " summer kitchen " is a distinctively Russian German institution. It is a separate building, of one large or two small rooms, situated a few feet from the kitchen door of the main dwelling. In the German colonies in Russia, this structure was the chief means of protection against...
Page 1 - Dutch " to the American colonies and which, after the middle of the eighteenth century, was diverted for some years into various European countries. The Volga " colonists," as they have been called in Russia, have lived, during the past one hundred and fifty years, in their exclusively German villages, retaining their own language, customs, and religion. They have been influenced but slightly by the life about them, and untouched entirely by the great forward movements in the world at large. This...
Page 58 - Bureau of the Census, Mortality Statistics, 1911, 12. The death rate for Russia, 1901-1905, was 30.9 per 1,000. Idem, 13. In 1912 the death rate for the Volga Protestant colonies was approximately 19 per 1,000. See Fricdensboten Kalender, 1914. 34 The crude death rate for the registration area of the United States in 1911 was 14.2 (exclusive of still births). Bureau of the Census, Mortality Statistics, 1911, 9. 35 The effect of the foreign population of a city upon the mortality rates is frequently...
Page 80 - These young men did not marry until they were 26 or 28 years of age, or until they had worked long enough for themselves to gather sufficient property to marry. 70 For the marriage season among the Slavs in Pennsylvania, see Roberts, Anthracite Coal Communities, 65-66. 71 This is a survival of an old German custom which was at one time universal and which is still retained in many rural sections of the Empire. Mogk, Deutsche Sitten und Braeuche...
Page 1 - Germaus: a Study of an Immigrant Group in the Midwest. An understanding of the sociological problems presented has made necessary an extensive historical survey of these people. The subjects of this study come from the two Volga provinces of Saratow and Samara, located in the southeastern part of European...
Page 45 - The state, however, is still included (1914) in the list of commonwealths where " good birth registration laws have been enacted although their enforcement does not yet meet the census requirements."11 In 1909 the State Registrar of Vital Statistics was made the depositary of data on marriage and divorce, to whom annual reports are to be made...
Page 65 - ... 47 The Russian German midwives employ many customs belonging to the folk medicine of the German villages. For instance, they will not allow the mother to go to sleep, nor will they give her cold water to drink. They wash the new born child's eyes with milk and place a cloth wet with whisky...
Page 65 - Transactions of the First Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study and Prevention of Infant Mortality.

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