Bracebridge Hall ; Tales of a Traveller ; The Alhambra

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Library of America, 1991 - Fiction - 1104 pages
7 Reviews
This second Library of America volume of Washington Irving brings together for the first time three collections of his stories and sketches. Bracebridge Hall (1822) was published under the pseudonym Geoffrey Crayon, and centers on an English manor, its inhabitants, and the tales they tell. Interspersed with witty, evocative sketches of country life among the English nobility is the well-known tale "The Stout Gentleman" and stories based on English, French, and Spanish folklore, vividly recounted with Irving's inimitable blend of elegance and colloquial dash. Tales of a Traveller (1824), written after a year-long stay in Germany, is a pivotal work in Irving's career, marking his last experiment with fiction before he turned to the writing of history, biography, and adaptation of folktales. The Alhambra (1832) was inspired by Irving's stay during the spring and summer of 1829 at the ancient Moorish palace in Granada, which he called "one of the most remarkable, romantic, and delicious spots in the world."

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JVioland - LibraryThing

Irving is one of my favorites - and not because of his Sketch Book, but because he is a writer par excellence. These works were engaging and flowed so easily that I forgot I was reading. Read full review

Review: Bracebridge Hall, Tales of a Traveller, The Alhambra

User Review  - James Violand - Goodreads

Irving is one of my favorites - and not because of his Sketch Book, but because he is a writer par excellence. These works were engaging and flowed so easily that I forgot I was reading. Read full review

Contents

Volume I
7
Family Servants
21
Bracebridge Hall i
22
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Washington Irving, one of the first American authors to earn his living from writing, was born in 1783 and died in 1859.
Painting is as much a part of the Moses family tradition as the family homestead in Eagle Bridge, New York. There Will Moses has painted since he was a little boy, learning firsthand from his grandfather, folk artist Forrest Moses, who learned from his mother, Anna Mary Robertson Moses, better known as Grandma Moses. Developing his own folk style, Will has become an internationally beloved artist in his own right, his work displayed in collections throughout the world, including that of the White House. His folk art can also be found in such books as The Night Before Christmas, Will Moses' Mother Goose, and Mary and Her Little Lamb

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