Anabasis (Google eBook)

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Page 171 - Faulchon, like those of the Lacedaemonians, with which they cut the Throats of those they over-powered, and afterwards, cutting off their Heads, carried them away in Triumph. It was their Custom to sing and dance, whenever they thought the Enemy saw them. They had Pikes fifteen Cubits in length, with only one Point. They staid in their Cities 'till the Greeks marched past them, and then followed harassing them perpetually. After that they retired to their...
Page 61 - The asses, when they were pursued, having gained ground of the horses, stood still (for they exceeded them much in speed) ; and when these came up with them, they did the same thing again ; so that our horsemen could take them by no other means but by dividing themselves into relays, and succeeding one another in the chase. The flesh of those that were taken was like that of red deer, but more tender.
Page 99 - Clearchus hearing this, asked the messenger of what extent the country was that lay between the Tigris and the canal : he answering it was of a large extent, and contained besides villages, many large cities, they concluded that the barbarians had sent this man insidiously, from an apprehension lest the Greeks should not pass the bridge, but remain in the island, which was defended on one side by the Tigris, and on the other by the canal ; where the country that lay between being large and fruitful,...
Page 71 - It was now in the middle of the day, and no enemy was yet to be seen ; but in the afternoon there appeared a dust like a white cloud which not long after spread itself like a darkness over the plain ! when they drew nearer, the brazen armour flashed, and their spears and ranks appeared, having on their left a body of horse armed in white corselets, (said to be commanded by Tissaphernes) and followed by those with...
Page 114 - I can neither sleep (which I suppose is your case also) nor lie any longer, when I consider the condition to which we are reduced : for it is plain the enemy would not have declared war against us had they not first made the necessary preparations ; while, on our side, none takes any care how we may resist them in the best manner possible. If we are remiss, and fall under the power of the king, what have we to expect from him who cut off the...
Page 172 - Order it is not known, bringing together a great many Stones, made a large Mount, upon which they placed a great Quantity of Shields made of raw Ox-hides, Staves, and Bucklers taken from the Enemy. The Guide himself cut the Bucklers in Pieces, and exhorted the rest to do the same. After this the Greeks sent back their Guide, giving him Presents out of the public Stock, these were a Horse, a silver Cup, a Persian Dress, and ten Daricks. But, above all Things the Guide desired the Soldiers to give...
Page 73 - Greeks sung the paean, and began to advance against the enemy; but the motion occasioning a small fluctuation in the line of battle, those who were left behind hastened their march, and at once gave a general shout, as their custom is when they invoke the god of war, and all ran forward, striking their shields with their pikes, as some say, to frighten the enemy's horses ; so that before the...
Page 74 - The king, therefore, being at that time in the centre of his own battle, was, however, beyond the left wing of Cyrus; and when he saw none opposed him in front, nor any motion made to charge the troops that were drawn up before him, he wheeled to the left in order to surround their army...
Page 93 - Such as we have in Greece they give to their domestics ; but those which are reserved for the masters are chosen fruit, and worthy of admiration both for their beauty and size, having in all respects the appearance of amber, and so delicious that they are frequently dried for sweetmeats. The wine that was made of it was sweet to the taste, but apt to give the headache. Here the soldiers ate for the first time the pith of the palm...
Page 163 - There was also wheat, barley, and legumens, and beer in jars, in which the malt itself floated even with the brims of the vessels, and with it reeds, some large and others small, without joints. These, when any one was dry, he was to take into his mouth and suck. The liquor was very strong, when unmixed with water, and exceeding pleasant to those who were used to it.

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