Bookwomen: Creating an Empire in Children’s Book Publishing, 1919–1939 (Google eBook)

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Univ of Wisconsin Press, Sep 25, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 264 pages
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The most comprehensive account of the women who, as librarians, editors, and founders of the Horn Book, shaped the modern children's book industry between 1919 and 1939. The lives of Anne Carroll Moore, Alice Jordan, Louise Seaman Bechtel, May Massee, Bertha Mahony Miller, and Elinor Whitney Field open up for readers the world of female professionalization. What emerges is a vivid illustration of some of the cultural debates of the time, including concerns about "good reading" for children and about women's negotiations between domesticity and participation in the paid labor force and the costs and payoffs of professional life.

Published in collaboration among the University of Wisconsin Press, the Center for the History of Print Culture in Modern America (a joint program of the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the Wisconsin Historical Society), and the University of Wisconsin–Madison General Library System Office of Scholarly Communication.

  

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This is an open access book available for complete and legal download from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries:
http://parallelpress.library.wisc.edu/books/print-culture/bookwomen.shtml

Contents

1 Troublesome Womanhood and New Childhood
15
Anne Carroll Moore Alice Jordan and the Public Library
30
Bookshops the WEIU and Bertha Everett Mahony
49
Childrens Book Publishing and Louise Hunting Seaman
65
5 Becoming Experts and Friends
87
6 Building Professional Culture
118
7 Triumph and Transition
138
Epilogue
158
Notes
169
Bibliography
197
Index
207
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Jacalyn Eddy is lecturer in humanities at the State University of New York at Geneseo.

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