Dark Throne

Front Cover
Lulu.com, Nov 1, 2007 - Fiction - 396 pages
2 Reviews
The virus is sweeping through the human community. The Drek war machine continues to press forward, capturing and converting millions of humans. And the Ynos begin their military attacks in earnest, destroying Imperium forces at will. This is the Imperium that Ailanthus has inherited as the new emperor and he is making it perfectly clear that he doesn't want anything to do with it. Ailanthus will be betrayed, he will lose two close friends and his responsibilities as the new emperor will make it harder and harder for him to remain sane. Meanwhile, Lord Cardinal Cebrenia is working ever closer to control of The Church of the Blessed Prophets and her revenge and the Lord Cardinal Nerodia is getting closer and closer to insanity as all his hard work begins to slip through his fingers.

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Reviewed by Stephanie D. for Readers Favorite
"Dark Throne" is the third in the absorbing and masterfully-written 'Dark Pilgrim series' which has at its heart Ailanthus and his small band of
friends of assorted species. “I am Bhasan Volans, son of Deneb Aquila Volans, and I am the Emperor of the Imperium,” announces Ailanthus during a meeting with the Druzsni leadership. He is only pretending at the time. Whether he is or isn’t, and whether he can or cannot bring himself to assume this role, is the uniting theme of this book, set in a very disunited galaxy. Ailanthus feels nothing but antipathy towards the Imperium. Can he really be expected to lead it? Can he bring peace to the huge diversity of co-existing lifeforms that include humans, Kroor, Dwad Mehstiv, Ynos, Morype Slugs, H’Chalk and Druzsni. If that is not enough, the Lord Cardinals of The Church of the Blessed Prophet continue to scheme and complicate matters in their attempts to retain control of both the Church and the Imperium. Can Ailanthus control them?
I feel this book is even more neatly structured than its predecessors. It opens and closes with references to the Ynos, threatened at first but posing a threat themselves at the end. There is betrayal throughout, in small and big gestures. Not only does Ailanthus face it, but he knows he will perpetrate it himself if he is to unite the warring galaxy. In the prologue we see Marines spilling out of their ship “like a virus”. Another virus runs rampant both through the galaxy and the book. The epilogue closes with the observation that humans are chaotic, but this meticulously organized and tightly constructed novel suggests the exact opposite!
 

Review: Dark Throne

User Review  - Susan - Goodreads

The galaxy flees in vain before the vengeance of the Ynos. Four thousand years ago, their peaceful cousins were viciously hunted down and exterminated in a glut of greed. Now they have returned ... Read full review

Bibliographic information