The Portable Roman Reader (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jan 27, 1977 - History - 672 pages
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The Romans conquered most of the known world and detailed their conquests in calm, unapologetic histories. They were a supremely urbane people who longed poetically for the farming life. Valuing toughness and practicality in all things, they turned the love poem into a cynical rebuke and wrote tragedies in which the unfathomable actions of gods gave way to the staggering cruelties of man. As the empire slid into decay, Tacitus pulled back the curtain on the perverse intrigues of the emperors, and a Roman-educated Christian named Augustine recounted his spiritual awakening in what may be the world’s first psychological novel.This collection presents the essential writings of the Romans in their finest English translations: the comedies of Terence and Plautus; the histories of Julius Caesar, Livy and Tacitus; the oratory of Cicero; poems by Catullus, Virgil, Horace, and Martial; the philosophy of Lucretius and Boëthius, along with the stylishly narrated and often ribald myths of Ovid and Apuleius.


  

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Contents

A NOTE ON SELECTIONS AND TRANSLATIONS
EDITORS NOTE
CHARACTERS
ACT I SCENE I
ACT I SCENE II
ACT I SCENE III
ACT II SCENE I
ACT II SCENE II
ACT IV SCENE IV
ACT IV SCENE VI
ACT V SCENE III
ACT V SCENE IV
ACT V SCENE VI
Book I
Book III
The First Expedition to Britain

ACT III SCENE I
ACT III SCENE II
ACT III SCENE III
ACT III SCENE IV
ACT IV SCENE I
ACT IV SCENE III
ACT V SCENE I
ACT V SCENE II
CHARACTERS
SCENEAthens
ACT I SCENE I
ACT I SCENE III
ACT I SCENE V
ACT I SCENE VI
ACT I SCENE VII
ACT II SCENE I
ACT II SCENE II
ACT II SCENE III
ACT II SCENE V
ACT II SCENE VII
ACT II SCENE VIII
ACT III SCENE I
ACT III SCENE II
ACT III SCENE IV
ACT IV SCENE I
ACT IV SCENE II
The Germans
VIII Miser Catulle
IX Verani omnibus e meis amicis
XXXI Paene insularum Sirmio
LI Ille mi par esse deo videtur
LVIII Caeli Lesbia nostra
LXX Nulli se dicit
LXXXV Odi et amo
From theEclogues
From theOdes
From theSatires
FromThe History of Rome
From theMetamorphoses
From theEpistles
Medea
From thePharsalia
From the Satyricon
From theEpigrams
From the Annals
From Germany
From the Satires
Cupid and Psyche
The Vigil of Venus
From the Confessions
From The Consolation of Philosophy
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