Hooker's Journal of Botany and Kew Garden Miscellany, Volume 4 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sir William Jackson Hooker
Reeve, Benham, and Reeve, 1852 - Botany
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Page 151 - Much attention is paid to the cultivation of this tree : extensive districts of country are covered with it, and it forms an important branch of agricultural industry. In planting they are arranged, like the mulberry, in rows about twelve feet apart : both seeds and cuttings are employed.
Page 150 - This machine is formed of a circular stone groove, twelve feet in diameter, three inches deep, and about as many wide, into which a thick solid stone wheel, eight feet in. diameter, tapering at the edge, is made to revolve perpendicularly by an ox harnessed to the outer end of its axle, the inner turning on a pivot in the centre of the machine.
Page 149 - This latter apparatus, of the rudest description, is constructed of two large beams placed horizontally, so as to form a trough capable of containing about fifty of the rings with their sebaceous cakes; at one end it is closed, and at the other adapted for receiving wedges, which are successively driven into it by ponderous sledge-hammers wielded by athletic men. The tallow oozes in a melted state into a receptacle below, where it cools. It is again melted and poured into tubs, smeared with mud to...
Page 86 - The quantity of solid gutta obtained from each tree varies from five to twenty catties, so that, taking the average at ten catties which is a tolerably liberal one, it will require the destruction of ten trees to produce one picul. Now the quantity exported from Singapore to Great Britain and the continent from 1st January...
Page 151 - ... was discovered; since which time that article has been wholly superseded by the more costly but incomparably superior product of this insect. It has been described by...
Page 150 - ... having been removed in the manner described. The kernel and the husk covering it are ground between two stones, which are heated to prevent clogging from the sebaceous matter still adhering.
Page 149 - The article thus obtained becomes a solid mass on falling through the sieve, and, to purify it, it is melted and formed into cakes for the press; these receive their form from bamboo hoops, a foot in diameter and three inches deep, which are laid on the ground over a little straw. On being filled with the hot liquid, the ends of the straw beneath are drawn up and spread over the top, and, when of sufficient * Misprinted, in the Journal of Botany,
Page 149 - ... inches deep, which are laid on the ground over a little straw. On being filled with the hot liquid, the ends of the straw beneath are drawn up and spread over the top, and, when of sufficient consistence, are placed with their rings in the press. This apparatus, which is of the rudest description, is constructed of two large beams placed horizontally, so as to form a trough capable of containing about fifty of the rings, with their...
Page 86 - Only a short time ago the Tuban Tree was tolerably abundant on the island of Singapore ; but already all the large timber has been felled, and few, if any, other than small plants are now to be found. The range of its growth, however, appears to be considerable ; it being found all up the Malayan Peninsula, as far as...
Page 150 - ... wheel, eight feet in diameter, tapering at the edge, is made to revolve perpendicularly, by an ox harnessed to the outer end of its axle, the inner turning on a pivot in the centre of the machine. Under this ponderous weight the seeds are reduced to a mealy state, steamed In the tubs...

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