The Lost Soul of American Politics: Virtue, Self-Interest, and the Foundations of Liberalism

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University of Chicago Press, Aug 15, 1986 - History - 409 pages
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The Lost Soul of American Politics is a provocative new interpretation of American political thought from the Founding Fathers to the Neo-Conservatives. Reassessing the motives and intentions of such great political thinkers as Madison, Thoreau, Lincoln, and Emerson, John P. Diggins shows how these men struggled to create an alliance between the politics of self-interest and a religious sense of moral responsibility—a tension that still troubles us today.
  

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Contents

II
5
III
20
IV
26
V
34
VI
41
VII
50
VIII
57
IX
64
XXV
148
XXVI
152
XXVII
155
XXVIII
158
XXIX
161
XXX
165
XXXII
169
XXXIII
177

X
71
XII
76
XIII
87
XIV
102
XVI
107
XVIII
120
XIX
133
XX
135
XXI
137
XXII
139
XXIII
142
XXIV
145
XXXIV
182
XXXV
194
XXXVI
199
XXXVII
232
XXXIX
279
XLI
336
XLII
349
XLIV
355
XLV
361
XLVII
368
XLVIII
397
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About the author (1986)

Intellectual historian John P. Diggins was born in San Francisco. He received a bachelor's degree from the University of California, Berkeley in 1957, a master's degree at San Francisco State College, and a doctorate at the University of Southern California in 1964. Before accepting a job at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in 1990, he taught intellectual history at San Francisco State College and the University of California, Irvine. He wrote numerous books during his lifetime including Mussolini and Fascism (1972), On Hallowed Ground (2000), Eugene O'Neill's America: Desire under Democracy (2007), and Ronald Reagan: Fate, Freedom and the Making of History (2007). He died due to complications of colon cancer on January 28, 2009 at the age of 73.

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