The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Oct 21, 2008 - History - 446 pages
20 Reviews
American s are justly proud of th e role their country played in liberating Europe from Nazi tyranny. For many years, we have celebrated the courage of Allied soldiers, sailors, and aircrews who defeated Hitler's regime and restored freedom to the continent. But in recounting the heroism of the "greatest generation," Americans often overlook the wartime experiences of European people themselves -- the very people for whom the war was fought.

In this brilliant new book, historian William I. Hitchcock surveys the European continent from D-Day to the final battles of the war and the first few months of the peace. Based on exhaustive research in five nations and dozens of archives, Hitchcock's groundbreaking account shows that the liberation of Europe was both a military triumph and a human tragedy of epic proportions.

Hitchcock gives voice to those who were on the receiving end of liberation, moving them from the edge of the story to the center. From France to Poland to Germany, from concentration-camp internees to refugees, farmers to shopkeepers, husbands and wives to children, the experience of liberation was often difficult and dangerous. Their gratitude was mixed with guilt or resentment. Their lives were difficult to reassemble.

This strikingly original, multinational history of liberation brings to light the interactions of soldiers and civilians, the experiences of noncombatants, and the trauma of displacement and loss amid unprecedented destruction. This book recounts a surprising story, often jarring and uncomfortable, and one that has never been told with such richness and depth.

Ranging from the ferocious battle for Normandy (where as many French civilians died on D-Day as U.S. servicemen) to the plains of Poland, from the icy ravines of the Ardennes to the shattered cities and refugee camps of occupied Germany, The Bitter Road to Freedom depicts in searing detail the shocking price that Europeans paid for their freedom.

Today, with American soldiers once again waging wars of liberation in faraway lands, this book serves as a timely and sharp reminder of the terrible human toll exacted by even the most righteous of wars.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stevesmits - LibraryThing

Themes of WWII military history (in Europe) are well-recognized by those with even the most casual interest. The astonishing perfidy of the German aggressors, the devastation wrought in eastern Europe ... Read full review

Review: The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe

User Review  - Bryan Craig - Goodreads

I highly recommend this book to any WWII buff and student. It is not a topic you read or hear much about. Hitchcock is an excellent writer and some of theses chapters are hard to read, but important. Read full review

Contents

A Cemetery in Luxembourg
1
LIBERATION IN THE WEST
11
Liberation in Normandy
19
The Elusive Liberation of Belgium
60
The Netherlands and the Politics of Food
98
Armies of Justice
125
Survival and Revenge
131
Americas Germany
170
Europes Displaced
249
We Felt Ourselves Lost
283
Belsen and the British
339
The Missing Liberation
367
Acknowledgments
375
Bibliography
415
Index
431
Copyright

They Have Suffered Unbearably
211

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About the author (2008)

William I. Hitchcock teaches history at Temple University in Philadelphia. He was born in Fukuoka, Japan in 1965, and has lived in Tokyo, Tel Aviv, Paris, Brussels, Washington, DC, Boston and New Haven.  He received his B.A. from Kenyon College in 1986 and his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1994. He taught at Yale for six years and won a teaching prize there. He has also taught at Wellesley College. He is the author of France Restored: Cold War Diplomacy and the Quest for Leadership in Europe (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1998); co-editor, with Paul Kennedy, of From War to Peace: Altered Strategic Landscapes in the Twentieth Century (New Have: Yale University Press, 2000); and The Struggle for Europe: The Turbulent History of a Divided Continent, 1945-present (New York: Doubleday and Anchor, 2003-2004).

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