Official aptitude maximized, expense minimized

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Clarendon Press, Aug 26, 1993 - Business & Economics - 504 pages
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The essays which Bentham collected together for publication in 1830 under the title of Official Aptitude Maximized; Expense Minimized, written at various times between 1810 and 1830, deal with the means of achieving efficient and economical government. In considering a wide range of themes inthe fields of constitutional law, public finance, and legal reform, Bentham places the problem of official corruption at the centre of his analysis. He contrasts his own recommendations for good administration, which he had fully developed in his magisterial Constitutional Code, with the severedeficiencies he saw in English practice. The core of the volume consists of four major essays directed against the principles and policies of four leading statesmen: Edmund Burke, George Rose, Robert Peel, and Lord Chancellor Eldon. Of particular concern to Bentham were the abuses sanctioned by thejudges and their officials in the Westminster Hall courts, which, he argues, resulted in the denial of justice to the majority of the population. In this volume, Bentham not only displays the precise logical reasoning for which he is well known, but also his considerable skills as a rhetorician ofreform.

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Contents

SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS
xiii
APPENDIX C
xliv
CONTENTS OF THIS VOLUME
3
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (1993)

Jeremy Bentham was born in London, in 1748, the son of an attorney. He was admitted to Queen's College, Oxford, at age 12 and graduated in 1763 An English reformer and political philosopher, Bentham spent his life supporting countless social and political reform measures and trying as well to create a science of human behavior. He advocated a utopian welfare state and designed model cities, prisons, schools, and so on, to achieve that goal. He defined his goal as the objective study and measurement of passions and feelings, pleasures and pains, will and action. The principle of "the greatest happiness of the greatest number," set forth in his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation, governed all of his schemes for the improvement of society, and the philosophy he devised, called utilitarianism, set a model for all subsequent reforms based on scientific principles.

Philip Schofield joined the Bentham Project, based at University College London, in 1984. He joined the Faculty of Laws as a Lecturer in 1993, and was subsequently appointed to a Readership and then to a personal Chair in the History of Legal and Political Thought. He was appointed Joint General
Editor, with Frederick Rosen, of The Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham in 1995, and has been sole General Editor since 2003. He has been Director of the Bentham Project since 2001.