Erasmus Darwin (Google eBook)

Front Cover
D. Appleton and Company, 1880 - Biologists - 216 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 142 - Soon shall thy arm, unconquered steam, afar Drag the slow barge or drive the rapid car ; Or, on wide-waving wings expanded, bear The flying chariot through the fields of air ; Fair crews triumphant, leaning from above, Shall wave their fluttering kerchiefs as they move, Or warrior bands alarm the gaping crowd, And armies shrink beneath the shadowy cloud.
Page 47 - But, wrapp'd in night with terrors all his own, He speaks in thunder when the deed is done. Hear him, ye Senates ! hear this truth sublime, " HE WHO ALLOWS OPPRESSION SHARES THE CRIME.
Page 225 - This book is a preservation photocopy. It is made in compliance with copyright law and produced on acid-free archival 60# book weight paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding Charlestown, Massachusetts 2001 The borrower must return this item on or before the last date stamped below.
Page 224 - Containing instructive and interesting articles and abstracts of articles, original, selected, and illustrated, from the pens of the leading scientific men of different countries. Subscription, to begin at any time, $5.00 per annum ; single copy, 60 cents.
Page 220 - II. Physics and Politics ; or, Thoughts on the Application of the Principles of "Natural Selection " and " Inheritance
Page 178 - A great want of one part of the animal " world has consisted in the desire of the " exclusive possession of the females...
Page 188 - The late Mr. David Hume, in his posthumous works, places the powers of generation much above those of our boasted reason; and adds, that reason can only make a machine, as a clock or a ship, but the power of generation makes the maker of the machine; and probably from having observed, that the greatest part of the earth has been formed out of organic recrements; as the Immense beds of limestone, chalk, marble, from the shells of fish; and the extensive provinces of clay, sandstone, ironstone, coals,...
Page 47 - And now, Philanthropy ! thy rays divine Dart round the globe from Zembla to the line ; O'er each dark prison plays the cheering light, Like northern lustres o'er the vault of night. From realm to realm, with cross or crescent crown'd, "Where'er mankind and misery are found, O'er burning sands, deep waves, or wilds of snow, Thy Howard journeying seeks the house of woe...
Page 207 - Roll on, ye Stars ! exult in youthful prime, Mark with bright curves the printless steps of time ; Near and more near your beamy cars approach, And lessening orbs on lessening orbs encroach ; Flowers of the sky...
Page 96 - Next to the measure of the language, the principal distinction appears to me to consist in this: that Poetry admits of but few words expressive of very abstracted ideas, whereas Prose abounds with them. And as our ideas derived from visible objects are more distinct than those derived from the objects of our other senses, the words expressive of these ideas belonging to vision make up the principal part of poetic language. That is, the Poet writes principally to the eye, the Prose-writer uses more...

Bibliographic information