The Cambridge Book of Poetry and Song (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Charlotte Fiske Bates
T.Y. Crowell & Company, 1832 - American poetry - 882 pages
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Incorrect date. Should be 1892.

Contents

r
xlvii
May Mason 844
xlviii
Elegy in a Country Churchyard T Gray 240
xlix
Abide with Me Lyre 353
l
Morris
li
Just Judgment
lii
A Summer Noon at Sea Sargent
liv
Good Night Shelley 495
lv
Abraham Lincoln Stoddard 540
lvi
Birds and their Loves Thomson 503
lvii
Tlu Tiger Blake 39
lviii
The Question Winter 660
lix
Different Sources of Funeral Tears
lx
Summer Dawn at Loch Katrine tZt Ariht369
1
ABBEY HENRY
2
Refuge from Doubt Miller 373
6
Mental Beauty Akensitie
7
A Day in Sussex Butsu3
8
Proposal 1Woii
11
ALLEN ELIZABETH AKERS
14
Labor Lont Houghton
15
The Tongue Cowper 714
18
The O11 Schoolhouse
31
The Tryst Sledman 536
32
The Raven A Poe425
35
Faith in MI Scott
40
The Other Life the End of This
48
To the Cuckoo Wordsworth 676
51
France aotanuth
53
Gray Ticknor 54
54
the re Wolcot 792
57
Blessed are They that Mourn Bryant
72
The Passage from Birth to Age
79
ANNAN ANNIE
86
Falling Stars Trench 606
92
J2 Eu gene to Dwell in Heaven Cunningham
97
c
99
Greece Byron
105
The Rhodora Emerson 214
114
To Tritlcrs Buchanan 807
115
A Portrait h B liromimg i
117
A Hesire Spalding 853
121
Ode to Simplicity W Collins
142
Last Verses M Collins
144
Mental Supremacy Tupper 616
160
The Paupers Deathbed
163
Last Verses Mot hermit 391
164
Friendship in Age and Sorrow
168
Those Evening Bells Moore 387
175
Merit bevond Beauty FoJe 768
181
Farewell Siimonds
190
What Makes a Hero? Str HJ m
193
Thou Knowest J C R Dorr
195
The Ageil Oak at Oakley
197
The Ancient Mariner refreshed S T Colerulje 135
204
Fritz s i finU
207
A Sunset Picture Falconer
218
Rondel fay
222
The Perpetuity of Song
225
The Biblical Knowledge of Hudibras b butler700
227
At a Club Dinner Madcap 756
233
Sabbath Morning Grahame
239
Little Martin Craghan Judaism245
245
The Two Brides Stoddard 540
247
Little Mattie E B Browning
252
From An Ode to the Rain T t olerulg
261
Calm on the Bosom of our God Hemanx
263
A Dreams Awakening S M B Piatt 420
264
Left Belrind Moutto u 845
273
What will it Matter?
275
The Two Highwaymen Illimt 802
279
Thy Art be Nature Wordsworth 674
280
From Friend to Friend Sgmomls
281
The Bluebirds Song Street 549
282
Long Ago H H Brownell 59
284
The Poets Friends
292
The Broom Flower HouHtt
294
What would I Save Thee from? Girfer
314
Advice to One of Simple Life Crabbe 718
321
Oft in the Stilly Night Moore 36
322
Sleep and Death taU171 Sleep the Detractor of Beauty Crabbe
323
From the Excquy on his Wife King
328
Dreams
338
The Chessboard B II Lyllon 840
347
Driving Home the Cows
403
Apostrophe to popular Applause oirper
411
My Answer Holer 804
422
True Nobility Pope
431
The Type of Struggling Humanity Holland 275
436
Afar in the Desert Pringle
437
Apostrophe to the whimsical rabhe
445
Grief for the Loss of the Dead Quartet
451
The Child and the Sea M M IJodge 192
454
Guardian Spirits Hogera
464
A Thought of the Past Sargent
470
Life in Death Savage
472
Where the Roses Grew uK0
483
Lifes Mystery A t ary 122
484
Fear of Death Shakespeare
487
Love of the Country Bloom1ield 42
488
To a Citv Pigeon Willis 650
490
The Cloud Shelley
492
Written at an Inn at Henley Shenstone
498
Ganging to and Ganging frae
502
The CourthV Lnteell 749
507
The Poplar Field
517
Written on Sunday morning B Soul hey
519
K ill Lowell 351
525
Affliction A T He fere 185
531
The Uncertain Man Cowper 714
536
Caradoc the liard of the Cyinrlans E B I ytton 839
547
The Crowded Street Bryant 78
559
Sonnet s on Leaving England Aemt
561
winter659
568
25
578
A VoiceI Newman 396
582
Changes B B I ytton
584
To a Violin Thaxter
588
A Wet Sheet and a Flowing Sea Cunningham 180
590
The Sandpiper Thaxter
591
Widowed noyic
601
The Death of the Virtuous Barbauld 28
606
My Comrade and I Tmtebridge
613
The Winged Worshippers Spragne 532
620
The Seed Growing Secretly Vauyhan
621
Life will be Gone ere 1 have Lived C Bronte 54
626
Her Conquest IuKs
627
Turn to the Helper Miller 373
631
Charity Dryilen 206
639
Gleaners Song
648
My lleid is like to liend Willie Mothenrell 301
649
The Burial of Moses Alexander 12
652
The Ship Becalmed S S Coleridge 135
657
Low Spirits Faber 217
672
Schnitzerls Philosopede Iudand 745
675
After a Mothers Death K Cook 150
676
Charity Gradually Pervasive Pope 4
684
Lines on a Prayerbook Crashair 816
710
Gods I
721
Quakenlmn Halpine
726
To my Cigar Sprague 533
734
The Distant in Nature and Experience Campbell 115
738
The Shower Vaughan 624
762
A Hospital K Spencer 527
766
Valborg Watching Axels Departure G Houghton 284
781
The Dragonfly Cormvell 815
793
Wisdom fmlW
801
Circumstance Tenngua 585
803
A Woman s O Hay J5S
808
The Souls Farewell Gould 238
815
The Emphatic Talker Coicjicr 715
818
My Little Boy that Died Craik 172
819
Lyric of Action Uayne
827
Early Summer Hopkinn
828
Seaway Hntchi
830
i2
832
Sonnet on Chillon
849
February Morns 389
853
Alexander at Persepolis Mirltell 370
859
Precott 434
861
Colnmbin r A e
862
God the only 1ust Judge
864
Home Wouuded UViS
865
Lack of Children
867
MaudMuller J G Whittier 613
875
The World is too much with us Wordsworth
878
withered RW
882
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Page 667 - Of aspect more sublime; that blessed mood, In which the burthen of the mystery, In which the heavy and the weary weight Of all this unintelligible world, Is lightened: that serene and blessed mood, In which the affections gently lead us on, Until, the breath of this corporeal frame And even the motion of our human blood Almost suspended, we are laid asleep In body, and become a living soul: While with an eye made quiet by the power Of harmony, and the deep power of joy, We see into the life...
Page 314 - Homer ruled as his demesne : Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken ; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific and all his men Looked at each other with a wild surmise: Silent, upon a peak in Darien.
Page 310 - It is not growing like a tree In bulk, doth make Man better be ; Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere : A lily of a day Is fairer far in May, Although it fall and die that night It was the plant and flower of Light. In small proportions we just beauties see ; And in short measures life may perfect be.
Page 671 - Hence in a season of calm weather, Though inland far we be, Our Souls have sight of that immortal sea Which brought us hither, Can in a moment travel thither, And see the Children sport upon the shore, And hear the mighty waters rolling evermore...
Page 241 - The applause of listening senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their history in a nation's eyes, Their lot forbade: nor circumscribed alone Their growing virtues, but their crimes confined; Forbade to wade through slaughter to a throne, And shut the gates of mercy on mankind...
Page 423 - But our love it was stronger by far than the love Of those who were older than we Of many far wiser than we And neither the angels in heaven above, Nor the demons down under the sea, Can ever dissever my soul from the soul Of the beautiful Annabel Lee.
Page 493 - I am the daughter of Earth and Water, And the nursling of the Sky ; I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores ; I change, but I cannot die. For after the rain when with never a stain, The pavilion of heaven is bare, And the winds and sunbeams with their convex gleams, Build up the blue dome of air, I silently laugh at my own cenotaph, And out of the caverns of rain, Like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb, I arise and unbuild it again.
Page 672 - She dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of Dove, A Maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love : A violet by a mossy stone Half hidden from the eye ! Fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky. She lived unknown, and few could know When Lucy ceased to be ; But she is in her grave, and, oh, The difference to me...
Page 485 - To die, to sleep; To sleep: perchance to dream; ay, there's the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause: there's the respect That makes calamity of so long life...
Page 282 - With fingers weary and worn, With eyelids heavy and red, A woman sat in unwomanly rags, Plying her needle and thread Stitch ! stitch ! stitch ! In poverty, hunger, and dirt, And still with a voice of dolorous pitch, Would that its tone could reach the Rich ! She sang this

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