Breaking blue

Front Cover
Knopf, May 1, 1992 - Political Science - 267 pages
30 Reviews
On the night of September 4, 1935, during a season of unsolved robberies, the town marshal of Pend Oreille County in the state of Washington was shot to death. Here is the story of how one man's hunt through a half century of police cover-ups unlocked the secret behind the nation's oldest continuing murder investigation.

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The writing is boring, slow and sometimes repetitive. - Goodreads
Timothy Egan is an important Western writer. - Goodreads
There is an extremely unclear plot line. - Goodreads
The writing is not so compelling, but the story is. - Goodreads
Not a writer of Westerns, but a Western writer. - Goodreads

Review: Breaking Blue

User Review  - Jodie - Goodreads

I SO wanted to enjoy this due to its content and location. However, I could hardly keep my eyes open each time I tried to read. The writing is boring, slow and sometimes repetitive. At other times, it's confusing. I am intrigued by the story, but the author did not keep me engaged. Read full review

Review: Breaking Blue

User Review  - Bob Anderson - Goodreads

This is another well written book from Timothy Egan about a murder in Washington State that went unsolved for a very long time. In the end I had to wonder if who suffered most from solving it the criminal or the tenacious sheriff who pursued him. Read full review

Contents

Judgment Day
3
The Need for Butter
15
3 Cop Code
22
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

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About the author (1992)

Timothy Egan is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and the author of five books, most recently The Worst Hard Time, which won a National Book Award for nonfiction and was named a New York Times Editorsa (TM) Choice, a New York Times Notable Book, a Washington State Book Award winner, and a Book Sense Book of the Year Honor Book. Egan writes a weekly column, a oeOutposts, a for the New York Times.