The poetical works of William Wordsworth, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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1827
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Page 26 - For why ? . because the good old rule Sufficeth them, the simple plan, That they should take who have the power, And they should keep who can.
Page 142 - Roused though it be full often to a mood Which spurns the check of salutary bands, That this most famous stream in bogs and sands Should perish; and to evil and to good Be lost for ever.
Page 19 - Reaper Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; 0 listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.
Page 134 - TOUSSAINT, the most unhappy Man of Men ! Whether the whistling Rustic tend his plough Within thy hearing, or thy head be now Pillowed in some deep dungeon's earless den ;-- O miserable Chieftain ! where and when Wilt thou find patience...
Page 33 - Selkirk town, Who have been buying, selling, Go back to Yarrow, 'tis their own ; Each maiden to her dwelling ! On Yarrow's banks let herons feed, Hares couch, and rabbits burrow ! But we will downward with the Tweed, Nor turn aside to Yarrow.
Page 147 - ... from its emasculating food; The truth should now be better understood; Old things have been unsettled; we have seen Fair seed-time, better harvest might have been But for thy trespasses; and, at this day, If for Greece, Egypt, India, Africa, Aught good were destined, thou would'st step between. England ! all nations in this charge agree : But worse, more ignorant in love and hate, Far far more abject, is thine Enemy : Therefore the wise pray for thee, though the freight Of thy. offences be...
Page 12 - And seemliness complete, that sways Thy courtesies, about thee plays ; With no restraint, but such as springs From quick and eager visitings Of thoughts, that lie beyond the reach Of thy few words of English speech : A bondage sweetly brooked, a strife That gives thy gestures grace and life ! So have I, not unmoved in mind, Seen birds of tempest-loving kind, Thus beating up against the wind.
Page 132 - ON THE EXTINCTION OF THE VENETIAN REPUBLIC. ONCE did She hold the gorgeous East in fee ; And was the safeguard of the West : the worth Of Venice did not fall below her birth, Venice, the eldest Child of Liberty. She was a Maiden City, bright and free ; No guile seduced, no force could violate ; And, when She took unto herself a Mate, She must espouse the everlasting Sea. And what if she had seen those glories fade, Those titles vanish, and that strength...
Page 352 - BEHOLD a Pupil of the Monkish gown, The pious ALFRED, King to Justice dear ; Lord of the harp and liberating spear ; Mirror of Princes ! Indigent Renown Might range the starry ether for a crown Equal to his deserts...
Page 95 - The travellers know it not, and 'twill remain Unknown to them ; but it is beautiful ; And if a man should plant his cottage near, Should sleep beneath the shelter of its trees, And blend its waters with his daily meal, He would so love it, that in his death-hour . Its image would survive among his thoughts : And therefore, my sweet MARY, this still Nook, With all its beeches, we have named from You ! 1800.

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