Tijuana Bibles: Art and Wit in America's Forbidden Funnies, 1930s-1950s

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Simon & Schuster, Feb 17, 2004 - Fiction - 160 pages
4 Reviews
ABOVEGROUND FOR THE FIRST TIME!

As wry and raunchy as the subject it celebrates, this inspired volume introduces a new generation to the Tijuana Bibles, underground comic art form the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s devoted to making sexual mockery of every sacred cow in the pasture. Folk art with a subversive edge, the Bibles are unveiled here with a hundred life-size reproductions.

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Review: Tijuana Bibles: Art and Wit in America's Forbidden Funnies, 1930s-1950s (Tijuana Bibles)

User Review  - Dennis - Goodreads

I found this to be absolutely hilarious - loved it! Read full review

Review: Tijuana Bibles: Art and Wit in America's Forbidden Funnies, 1930s-1950s (Tijuana Bibles)

User Review  - Aaron Goodier - Goodreads

My favorite one is where Popeye's father Pappy breaks down a door with his three-foot-long penis. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Bob Adelman is an author, editor, teacher, book producer, and world-renowned photojournalist. His picture stories have frequently appeared in "Life, " the "London Times Magazine, Stern, " and the "New York Times Magazine." In varying roles he has done more than forty books; the most recent are his "Carver Country" and "Visions of Liberty." He vividly recalls his nervous excitement at first gaping at a Tijuana Bible. Nowadays he more maturely reads them for laughs and insights, but now and again their provocative powers become undeniable.

The Pulitzer prize winning author of "Maus" and "Maus II", Art Spiegelman was born in Stockholm, Sweden, and grew up in Rego Park, New York. He is also the co-founder/editor of RAW, the acclaimed magazine of avant-garde comix and graphics and the illustrator of the lost classic "The Wild Party" by Joseph Moncure March. Spiegelman's work has been published in more than sixteen languages and has appeared in "The New York Times, Village Voice, " and "Playboy", among others. He has been a contributing editor and cover artist for "The New Yorker" since 1992.

Spiegelman attended the High School of Art and Design in New York City and SUNY Binghamton and received an honorary doctorate of letters from SUNY Binghamton in 1995. He began working for the Topps Gum Company in 1966, as association that lasted over twenty years. There he created novelty cards, stickers and candy products, including Garbage Candy, Wacky Packages and Garbage Pail Kids. He began producing underground comix in 1966, and in 1971 moved to San Francisco, where he lived until 1975.

His work began appearing in such publications as "East Village Other, Bijou" and "Young Lust Comix". In 1975-76, he, along with Bill Griffith, founded "Arcade, The Comic Revue". His book, "Breakdowns", an anthology of his comics, was published in 1977.

Spiegelman moved back to New York City in 1975, and began doing drawing and comix for "The New York Times, Village Voice" and others. He became an instructor at The School of Visiual Arts from 1979-1987. In 1980, Spiegelman and his wife, Francoise Mouly, started the magazine RAW, which has over the years changed the public's perception of comics as an art form. It was in RAW that "Maus" was first serialized. In 1986, Pantheon Books published the first half of "Maus" and followed with "Maus II" in 1991. In 1994 he designed and illustrated the lost Prohibition Era classic by Joseph Moncure March, "The Wild Party". In 1997, Spiegelman's first book for children, "Open Me ... I'm a Dog" was published by HarperCollins.

Art Spiegelman has received The National Book Critics Circle nomination in both 1986 and 1991, the Guggenheim fellowship in 1990, and a special Pulitzer Prize in 1992. His art has been shown in museums and gallery shows in the United States and abroad, including a 1991 show at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

He and his wife, Francoise Mouly, live in lower Manhattan with their two children, Nadja and Dashiell.

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