The Miscellaneous Poems of William Wordsworth, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1820 - English poetry
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Contents

Aerial Rock
134
Written upon a blank Leaf
135
The WildDucks Nest
136
Fallen and diffused
137
Page posed lished 138 Methought I saw 1807
138
Surprized by
139
How clear 1815
140
To R B Haydon
141
Composed in One of the Valleys of Westmoreland
142
Grief thou hast lost
143
To the River Derwent
144
watch and long
145
To a SnowDrop
146
CaptivJtj
148
ill tttttftfuM
150
_Uri eontjnVwE
151
concluded
152
To Sleep jgo7
153
To Sleep 1807
155
With Ships 1807
156
It is a beauteous Evening 1807
157
Composed on the Eve of the Marriage of a Friend
158
On approaching Home 1803
159
From the dark chambers
160
lage posed lislied 165 While not a leaf seems faded
165
Pure Element of Waters
166
Gordale
167
Malham Cove
168
Composed during a severe Storm
169
Composed on the Banks of a Rocky Stream
170
Written in very early Youth
171
Composed upon Westminster Bridge 1803 1807
172
Pelion and Ossa 1807
173
Brook whose society
174
Hail Twilight
175
The Shepherd looking eastward
176
Admonition 1807
177
Beloved Vale 1807
178
To the Lady Beaumont
179
The World is too much with us i 1807
180
How sweet it is when 1807
181
Where lies the Land 1807
182
Even as a Dragons
183
Mark the concentred
184
To the Poet John Dyer
185
Composed after a journey across the Hamilton Hills 1802 1807
186
Page posed lished 187 These words iso?
187
Degenerate Douglas 18O7
188
To the Lady Mary Lowther
189
On seeing a tuft of Snowdrops
190
From the Italian of Michael Angelo
191
From the same
192
From the same
193
heard alas I
194
The Stars are Mansions
195
To a Friend 1307
207
grieved for Buonaparte 1801
208
Festivals have I seen 1802
209
On the extinction of the Venetian Republic
210
To Toussaint POuverture
212
We had a fellowPassenger 1802
213
Composed in the Valley near Dover
214
Inland within a hollow Vale 1802
215
Thought of a Briton on the subju gation of Switzerland
216
Written in London 1802
217
Milton thou shouldst be living 1802
218
Great men have been
219
It is not to
220
When I have borne
221
One might believe 1803
222
There is a bondage
223
These times touch 1803
224
England the time is come
225
When looking on 1803
226
To the Men of Kent 1803
227
Six thousand Veterans 1803
228
Anticipation 1803
229
Another Year 1806
230
SONNETS DEDICATE TO LIBERTY PART II
231
On a celebrated Event in ancient History
233
Page posed lished 235 To Thomas Clarkson 1807
235
A Prophecy iso7
236
Composed while the Author was en gaged in writing a Tract 1808
237
On the Same
238
Hoffer
239
Advance come forth
240
Feelings of the Tyrolese
241
Alas what boots the long
242
And is it among
243
Oer the wide earth
244
On the final submission of the Tyrolese
245
Hail Zaragoza
246
Say what is honour
247
The martial courage
248
Brave Schill
249
Call not the royal
250
Look now on that
251
Is there a Power
252
Ah where is Palafox 1810
253
In due observance
254
Feelings of a Noble Biscay an 181O
255
The Oak of Guernica 1810
256
Indignation of a highminded Spaniard 1810
258
Oerweening Statesman 181O
259
The French and the Spanish Guerillas 261 Spanish Guerillas mil
260
Page posed lished
262
On the Disinterment of the Remains
268
Ode The Morning of the Day
281
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Page 157 - IT is a beauteous evening, calm and free ; The holy time is quiet as a Nun Breathless with adoration...
Page 220 - IT is not to be thought of that the Flood Of British freedom, which, to the open sea Of the world's praise, from dark antiquity Hath flowed, ' with pomp of waters, unwithstood,' Roused though it be full often to a mood Which spurns the check of salutary bands, That this most famous Stream in bogs and sands Should perish ; and to evil and to good Be lost for ever. In our halls is hung Armoury of the invincible Knights of old : We must be free or die, who speak the tongue That...
Page 154 - Sleepless! and soon the small birds' melodies Must hear, first uttered from my orchard trees; And the first cuckoo's melancholy cry. Even thus last night, and two nights more, I lay, And could not win thee, Sleep! by any stealth: So do not let me wear...
Page 129 - NUNS fret not at their convent's narrow room ; And hermits are contented with their cells , And students with their pensive citadels , Maids at the wheel, the weaver at his loom, Sit blithe and happy ; bees that soar for bloom, High as the highest Peak of Furness-fells, Will murmur by the hour in foxglove bells...
Page 221 - Now, when I think of thee, and what thou art, Verily, in the bottom of my heart, Of those unfilial fears I am ashamed. For dearly must we prize thee ; we who find In thee a bulwark for the cause of men ; And I by my affection was beguiled : What wonder if a Poet now...
Page 139 - But how could I forget thee? Through what power, Even for the least division of an hour, Have I been so beguiled as to be blind To my most grievous loss!
Page 217 - O FRIEND ! I know not which way I must look For comfort, being, as I am, opprest, To think that now our life is only drest For show ; mean handy-work of craftsman, cook, Or groom ! We must run glittering like a brook In the open sunshine, or we are unblest : The wealthiest man among us is the best : No grandeur now in nature or in book Delights us.
Page 210 - ON THE EXTINcTION OF THE VENETIAN REPUBLIc. ONcE did She hold the gorgeous East in fee ; And was the safeguard of the West : the worth Of Venice did not fall below her birth, Venice, the eldest Child of Liberty.
Page 226 - Raised up to sway the world, to do, undo, With mighty Nations for his underlings, The great events with which old story rings Seem vain and hollow ; I find nothing great : Nothing is left which I can venerate ; So that a doubt almost within me springs Of Providence, such emptiness at length Seems at the heart of all things.
Page 150 - is life; we have seen and see, And with a living pleasure we describe ; And fits of sprightly malice do but bribe The languid mind into activity. Sound sense, and love itself, and mirth and glee Are, fostered by the comment and the gibe.

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