A View of the Cultivation of Fruit Trees, and the Management of Orchards and Cider: With Accurate Descriptions of the Most Estimable Varieties of Native and Foreign Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums, and Cherries, Cultivated in the Middle States of America: Illustrated by Cuts of Two Hundred Kinds of Fruits of the Natural Size ... (Google eBook)

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M. Carey and son, 1817 - Fruit - 253 pages
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Page ii - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 173 - That species of blight which is sometimes called fire blight, frequently destroys trees in the fullest apparent vigor and health, in a few hours, turning the leaves suddenly brown as if they had passed through a hot flame, and causing a morbid matter to exude from the pores of the bark of a black ferruginous appearance.
Page 68 - The clear liquor should then be drawn off into another cask. If it remains bright and quiet, nothing more need be done to it till the succeeding spring ; but if a scum collects on the surface, it must immediately be racked off again, as this would produce bad effects if suffered to sink. Among the precautions used to prevent excessive fermentation is stumming, which is fuming the cask with burning sulphur. This is done by burning a rag impregnated with sulphur...
Page 100 - The following descriptions of a selection of one hundred kinds of the most estimable apples cultivated in our country, are intended to establish with some degree of certainty, the name, character, and origin of each variety...
Page 120 - An uncommonly large, fair, handsome red apple the form is round, flat at the ends: the skin is a lively red, streaked and spotted with a small portion of yellow : the stalk end frequently of a russet colour, both ends deeply indented ; the stalk very short, the taste is rich and pleasant, an admired table fruit, and excellent for cooking as well as for cider ; it ripens in October, and keeps well through the fall and winter. The tree is uncommonly large and handsome, the leaves small, it bears...
Page ii - Outs of two hundred kinds of Fruits of the natural size; intended to explain Some of the errors which exist relative to the origin, popular names, and character of many of our fruits; to identify them by accurate descriptions of their properties, and correct delineations of the full size and natural formation of each variety; and to exhibit a system of practice adapted to our climate, in the successive stages of a nursery, orchard, and cider establishment. By William Coxe, Esq., Of Burlington, New...
Page ii - An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned." And also to the act, entitled " An Act supplementary to an Act, entitled, " An Act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein mentioned," and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and...
Page ii - Title] in conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, intituled 'An Act for the encouragement of Learning by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts and Books to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies during the times therein mentioned.
Page 9 - James River in Virginia are the limits of that district of country which produces apples of the due degree of richness and flavor for both purposes. It will not be denied that apples grow well in the interior and elevated parts of the Southern States, as well as in warm and...
Page 108 - ... one third more of the Hagloes for a barrel of cider, than of common fruit : the juice, though uncommonly sheer, is singularly rich, and though the smell of the apple is faint, the flavour of the cider is high ; and when properly manufactured, is very rich. The colour of the flesh is pale, but that of the cider dark it ripens in August and September; keeps a long time without rotting it bears abundantly and early: the growth of the tree is very uncommon ; thick strong shoots ; buds, particularly...

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